Zinc


The Enzyme Activator

Zinc is a mineral that functions as a co-factor in numerous metabolic processes. In fact, zinc is a co-factor in over 200 enzymes in the body.

Zinc deficiency is associated with:

  • prostate enlargement
  • immune deficiency
  • atherosclerosis
  • malabsorption syndromes
  • slow wound healing
  • loss of taste or smell
  • impaired glucose tolerance
  • skin disorders of every type
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)
  • inflammatory bowel disease (IBS)
  • abnormal menstruation

The adult daily dose range is from 15-50 mg.

Food sources include wheat germ, wheat bran, pumpkin seed, avocado, sea food.

Caution: Large doses (more than 50mg/day) can cause a copper deficiency & other mineral imbalances. Copper should be supplemented when using zinc in high doses.

Optimal daily amounts of Zinc are easily obtained from Dr. Myatt’s Maxi Multi – a comprehensive multiple vitamin and mineral nutrient formula. Click here for full information.

 

Vitamin C

Master Immune Stimulant and Antioxidant

Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin that plays a major role in numerous biological functions including:

  • collagen synthesis (production of tendon, ligament, cartilage and skin)
  • immune function – increases white blood cell activity, interferon production and thymic hormone secretion.
  • cardiovascular health
  • cancer prevention

Levels of vitamin C are quickly depleted during infection. Our vitamin C is specially buffered to reduce acidity.

Vitamin C CapsulesVitamin C Buffered Capsules

One full gram of buffered vitamin C in every capsule.

An excellent source of antioxidant support, Buffered Vitamin C uses pure crystalline ascorbic acid to supply 1 gram of vitamin C in each capsule. This well-tolerated vitamin C formula supports a healthy immune system response and helps maintain healthy skin, collagen, and connective tissues.

Each (one) Capsule contains:
Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) – 1000 mg
Calcium (as calcium carbonate) – 20 mg
Magnesium (as magnesium carbonate) – 12 mg

Suggested dose: 1 capsule, 1-3 times per day, OR 1 capsule every 1-2 hours during acute illness, OR 1 capsule 3-4 times a day for accelerated vitamin C therapy.

Vitamin C Buffered Capsules – Product # 266 (60 Capsules) $15.95

Buffered Vitamin C Does Not Contain

  • artificial coloring
  • artificial flavoring
  • corn
  • dairy products
  • gluten
  • ingredients of animal origin
  • preservatives
  • salt
  • soy
  • sugar
  • wheat
  • yeast

Other Ingredients: vegetable capsule (modified cellulose), and ascorbyl palmitate.


Vitamin C Buffered Crystals

Description – High potency buffered vitamin Cpreparation in an effervescent, mineral-rich blend. Mixes easily in water or other beverages.

Each 1/4 teaspoon contains:
Vitamin C – 1066 mg
Calcium (calcium ascorbate) – 117 mg

Suggested dose: 1/4 teaspoon, 1-3 times per day, OR 1/4 teaspoon every 1-2 hours during acute illness, OR 1/4 teaspoon 3-4 times a day for accelerated vitamin C therapy.

Vitamin C Buffered Crystals – Product # 146 (8.8 ounces) $18.95

Tocotrienols


The “Other” Vitamin E

Tocotrienols“Vitamin E” is actually a mixture of tocotrienols and tocopherols, two forms of the same vitamin. Like tocopherols (the “classic” vitamin E), tocotrienols are also potent antioxidants that protect against lipid peroxidation (the damaging of fats by free radicals).

Research has shown that although tocotrienols and tocopherols possess similar activity, they work slightly differently in the body. The very newest research shows that tocotrienols may be even more valuable to good health than the classic form of vitamin E, tocopherols.

Actions of tocotrienols:

  • cholesterol-lowering properties not seen with regular vitamin E (tocopherols).
  • Tocotrienols reduce AGEs (advanced glycosylated end-products),
  • encourage healthy blood pressure levels and arterial health
  • support normal blood sugar balance
  • prevent fat oxidation

Both gamma- and delta-tocotrienols are powerful antioxidants working at the cells’ surface. Evidence indicates that tocotrienols are absorbed better than tocopherols.

The typical recommendation is 140 to 360 mg per day. Most studies have used 200 mg daily.

Contains: Tocotrienols 100 mg ( 90% Delta- Tocotrienols and 10% Gamma- Tocotrienols)

Other ingredients: Rice bran oil, gelatin, glycerin, water.

Suggested Dose: 1 or 2 softgels, one or two times daily or as directed by a healthcare practitioner.

References:

1. Kamal-Eldin A, Appelqvist LA. The chemistry and antioxidant properties of tocopherols and tocotrienols. Lipids 1996;31:671–701 [review].
2. Kamat JP, Devasagayam TPA. Tocotrienols from palm oil as potent inhibitors of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation in rat brain mitochondria. Neurosci Lett 1995;195:179–82.
3. Sen CK, Khanna S, Roy S. Tocotrienols: Vitamin E beyond tocopherols. Life Sci. 2006;78:2088-98.
4.) Schaffer S, Muller WE, and Eckert GP. Tocotrienols: constitutional effects in aging and disease. J Nutr. 2005;135:151-4.
5.) Theriault A, Chao JT, Wang Q, et al. Tocotrienol: a review of its therapeutic potential. Clin Biochem 1999;32:309–19 [review].

Vitamin E


The Premier Fat-Soluble Antioxidant

Vitamin E is the primary fat-soluble antioxidant vitamin in the body. (Vitamin C is the primary water-soluble antioxidant). Vitamin E plays a major role in  cellular respiration. Deficiencies of Vitamin E are associated with:

  • heart disease
  • cancer
  • strokes
  • arthritis
  • allergies
  • infections
  • inflammation
  • diabetes
  • neurological damage
  • muscle weakness
  • fibrocystic breast disease
  • eczema
  • macular degeneration
  • poor wound healing

Dietary sources of Vitamin E include: wheat germ oil, nuts, whole grains, egg yolk.

NOTE: Doses over 800 IU per day of vitamin E may elevate triglycerides.

Maxi Multi provides 400 IU per day of Vitamin E

Those requiring additional Vitamin E supplementation should consider Tocotrienols

Sinus Infection (Sinusitis)


Natural Support For This Troublesome Condition

Sinusitis is an infection of the sinus passages, usually the frontal (head/eyes) or nasal sinuses. Symptoms may include a thick nasal discharge, pain or tenderness over the involved sinuses, headache and sometimes fever with chills. Such infection can be a one-time occurrence but is more commonly chronic and recurrent.

Recent studies have shown that antibiotic therapy is largely useless for sinusitis. Only in cases of severe pain or when symptoms have been present for more than two weeks are antibiotics sometimes indicated. Another study has shown that over 90% of people with sinusitis have some degree of yeast or fungus growing in their sinus cavities.

Anything that causes swelling of the mucous membrane (internal “skin” that lines the sinus cavities) can block normal drainage of the sinuses and lead to infection. Common causes of chronic & recurrent sinusitis include food allergy, respiratory allergy, low immune function and dental infection. (Dental infection is a frequently-overlooked cause of chronic sinusitis).

Treatment involves both acute management AND correction of underlying, predisposing factors.

Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations

  • For acute sinusitis: Follow recommendations for diet listed under Colds and Flu. Avoid the foods listed below under “chronic sinusitis” during an acute attack.
  • For chronic sinusitis: Assess for food allergies. Milk, wheat, corn, citrus and peanut butter are common food allergens associated with sinusitis. It may be wise to avoid these foods until definitive allergy-testing is completed.
  • Have a dental check-up if you have not had one in the past six months.

Primary Support

  • Maxi Multi: 3 caps, 3 times per day with meals. Optimal (not minimal) doses of antioxidant nutrients (vitamin A, beta carotene, C, E, zinc, selenium) and bioflavonoids are especially important in treating sinusitis.
  • Max EPA (Omega-3 rich fish oil): 1-2 caps, 3 times per day with meals (target dose: 3-6 caps per day). Fish oil is anti-inflammatory.
  • Immune support: 2 caps, 1-2 times per day for general immune enhancement.

Additional Support

During acute episodes:

  • Bromelain: 2 caps, 4 times per day between meals. With improvement, decrease to 1 cap, 3-4 times per day. Bromelain thins mucous so it can exit the sinus passages. It will also aid with mucous digestion once this gunk makes it’s way to the stomach.
  • Use all recommendations for acute infection.
  • Use hot packs over the sinuses during acute attacks for pain relief and decongestion.
  • Inspirol inhalant – the most potent inhalant you’ve ever used! Breathe this at least 4 times per day, but up to hourly or more if needed, during acute infection.

Tests

  • Review the symptoms of Candidiasis. If you have more than 4 of the listed symptoms, consider having a Candida test performed.

Dr. Myatt’s Comment

Correction of the underlying factors involved in chronic or recurrent sinusitis, such as food allergy and Candidiasis, will nearly always correct the problem. If you have had chronic sinusitis for many years, be patient. Complete correction may take a year or more. Patients who have overcome chronic sinusitis problems tell me it’s well worth the effort.

 

Vitamins and Mineral Supplements

Your Concise Guide To Nutritional Supplements

Definitions

Vitamins are organic compounds that are necessary for human life and health. Vitamins cannot be manufactured in the body (vitamin B12 is an exception) and so must be obtained from diet.

Minerals are inorganic ions (metals) that are also necessary for life and health. Minerals are not manufactured in the body and so must be obtained from diet.

Trace minerals are minerals necessary to the body in extremely small, or “trace,” amounts.

Accessory nutrients are substances that are not absolutely necessary for life and health (as vitamins and minerals are), but that participate with vitamins and minerals in numerous biochemical reactions.

Vitamins: What You Should be Taking, and Why

Taking vitamins is a wise health and prevention measure. Deficiencies of vitamins and minerals cause many diseases. Adding vitamins and minerals in supplemental form is an inexpensive “insurance policy” against some of the worst diseases of modern times.

A deficiency of vitamins and minerals are associated with these diseases:

A deficiency of antioxidant vitamins and minerals (especially beta carotene, vitamins C & E, and selenium) is associated with higher incidence of cancers of the colon, breast, prostate, mouth, lungs and skin. Some researchers believe that antioxidant vitamin and mineral deficiencies may be related to higher incidence of all cancers.

A mineral deficiency, especially magnesium and potassium but also calcium, is associated with high blood pressure.

Deficiencies of vitamins E, C, B6, B12, folic acid (a B vitamin), and bioflavonoids are associated with cardiovascular disease. The connection between vitamin E and heart health is so well established that conventional medical cardiologists are instructed to recommend vitamin E to their patients.

Healthy bones, and the prevention of osteoporosis, depend on sufficient levels of minerals, including calcium, magnesium, boron, zinc, copper, B vitamins, and vitamin D.

In males, benign prostatic hypertrophy is associated with decreased levels of zinc. Zinc deficiency also correlates to decreased immune function. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and diabetes (high blood sugar) occur more frequently in people who are chromium deficient. After diabetes is present, low levels of vitamins A, C, E, plus zinc, selenium, choline, bioflavonoids and B complex vitamins are associated with more complications from the disease.

This list could go on for pages, but you get the idea. A deficiencyof key vitamins and mineralsare correlated with disease. Such vitamin deficiencies are also common in the modern American diet. Depleted soils result in lowered vitamin and mineral content in produce AND Americans eat less fresh produce than ever before. Much of our food is highly processed, removing not only vitamins and minerals but also fiber and enzymes.

The best health insurance may not be an expensive medical policy, but the addition of sufficient vitamins to fill in the gaps in our day-to-day nutritional status.

Some people take a wide array of individual and/or exotic supplements, but these should NOT replace a basic, healthful level of vitamin supplementation. I have listed the best and most complete formulas for basic multiple vitamin and mineral supplementation. I recommend this for all adults over age 18. If you have a special medical condition, consult an holistic physician for further recommendations. (See Telephone Consultations with Dr. Myatt)

Basic Vitamins and Minerals Supplement Program (For health maintenance in healthy individuals OR as the basis of a health program in those with known health problems). 1) Multi Vitamin / Mineral formula without iron (unless your doctor has specifically told you to take iron). There is no such thing as a good multiple vitamin supplement in a single pill. Optimal daily dosage levels of essential vitamins and minerals do not fit into one tablet or capsule. Expect to be taking 6 to 9 capsules or tablets to fulfill Optimal Daily Doses of key vitamins.

Modern Dietetics In A Nutshell

Nutritional Deficiencies

It has long been recognized that the human body will not function efficiently without vitamins and minerals. In fact, serious diseases and death result when nutrient levels become too low. Because vitamins and minerals are necessary for every chemical reaction in the body, an excess or deficiency can greatly alter physical function.

“RDA’s” (nutrient levels recommended by the U.S. Department of Agriculture) are sufficient to prevent serious deficiency-caused illnesses. (Rickets due to vitamin D deficiency, for example). They are not sufficient for optimal health and well-being.

Many scientists today agree that higher levels of certain nutrients are necessary to protect us from disease. It is also an accepted fact that even small deficiencies of nutrients can result in a decline in physical health, often before modern medicine can name a “disease.” Such deficiencies are called “subclinical,” (meaning “before they are a diagnosable illness”) and are the precursors to more serious illness.

The Standard American Diet (S.A.D.) is typically excessive in calories while being deficient in vitamins, minerals, and accessory nutrients. This is probably due to several factors: easy availability of refined-flour, high sugar foods; extensive processing of foods (which removes nutrients and fiber); and plant foods grown in mineral-deficient soils.

In addition, increased environmental exposure to toxic substances increases the body’s need for certain nutrients, especially antioxidants. (See Antioxidants.)

To ensure that you are obtaining optimal dietary nutrient levels, examine your current diet in view of the vitamin/mineral/accessory nutrient guide below. Keep a three-day diet diary to assist in calculating your baseline level of nutrient intake. Then, make dietary changes and take nutritional supplements as needed to ensure daily optimal nutrient intake.

Which Vitamin Formula is Right For You?

If you are a: Multiple Formula Antioxidants Comments Man Maxi Multi OR Once Daily MyPacks Included in Maxi Multi and MyPacks A separate antioxidant is usually needed with other multiples, not with these. Woman of Childbearing Age Nutrizyme with iron (see comment) OR Once Daily MyPacks Included in Maxi Multi and MyPacks Take a multiple WITH iron if you have heavy menstrual flow. Post-Menopausal Woman Maxi Multi OR Once Daily MyPacks Included in Maxi Multi and MyPacks Take additional Cal-Mag Amino to total 1200-1500 mg calcium per day if you are at risk for Osteoporosis. Senior Maxi Multi OR Nutrizyme with iron (see comments) Included in Maxi Multi and MyPacks Take a formula with iron only if directed to do so by your doctor. Children Children’s Multi-Vitamin and Minerals Children’s Antioxidants Specially formulated for children ages 4-12.

Vitamins

vitamin major functions major deficiency associations optimal adult dose range best food sources cautions/
notes
vitamin A bone formation
skin health vision night blindness, dry eyes,
skin diseases 5,000-10,000 IU fish liver oils Do not take more than 50,000 IU per day for 3 months without medical supervision.

beta-carotene

converted to vitamin A in the body; antioxidant ulcerative colitis, skin diseases, smoking 10,000-50,000 IU green and yellow vegetables; carrots Use only natural beta-carotene; high doses may cause yellow skin (harmless).

vitamin D

increases calcium absorption;
decreases overall mortality rate osteoporosis, rheumatic pains, dental disease,
cancer,
impaired immunity 800-5,000 IU or as
directed by a physician. SUNSHINE! fish liver oil egg yolk The current daily dose of 400IU may be be set too low for optimal health.

vitamin E (tocopherol)

cellular respiration; antioxidant heart disease neurological aging 200-800 IU wheat germ oil, nuts, whole grains, egg yolk Doses over
800 IU day may elevate triglycerides.

vitamin K

blood clotting factor; bone formation osteoporosis 20-100 mcg broccoli, spinach, green tea, green cabbage, tomato Do not supplement if you are on anti-epileptic medication.

vitamin C

collagen synthesis, anti-viral, wound healing, antioxidant joint pain/arthritis, atherosclerosis, bleeding gums, decreased immunity 300-3,000 mg broccoli, red pepper, citrus fruits, cabbage At high doses, vitamin C will loosen the bowels.

vitamin B1 (thiamine)

energy processes fatigue, mental confusion, neuropathy 5-100 mg eggs, berries, nuts, legumes, liver, yeast Nontoxic.

vitamin B2 (riboflavin)

energy processes, wound healing, activates other B vitamins infection, cataracts, blurred vision, eye surgery 5-100 mg green leafy vegetables, eggs, organ meats Nontoxic. Higher doses will make urine a harmless, bright yellow.

vitamin B3 (niacin)

energy processes depression, tension headaches, memory loss 20-100 mg milk, eggs, fish, whole meal wheat flour Doses greater than 50mg may cause a skin flush. Take high doses only with doctors supervision.

vitamin B5(pantothenic acid)

energy processes; adrenal gland function allergies, morning stiffness; fatigue; muscle cramps 10-1,000 mg eggs, yeast, liver No known toxicity.

vitamin B6(pyridoxine)

energy processes; antibody formation insomnia, irritability, atherosclerosis 5-200 mg wheat germ, yeast, whole grains Oral contraceptive use increases need for this vitamin.

Folic acid

red blood cell formation, RNA/DNA synthesis fatigue, depression, atherosclerosis 200-800 mcg beans, green leafy veggies, yeast Do not take with Phenobarbital or dilantin.

vitamin B12

red blood cell formation; energy processes atherosclerosis, memory loss, GI symptoms 10-1,200 mcg fermented soy products; root veggies Nontoxic.

Biotin

energy processes; blood sugar regulation muscle pain, depression 300-600 mcg egg yolks, whole wheat No known toxicity.

Minerals

Mineral: functions deficiency associations adult dose range food sources cautions

*Calcium

bone & tooth formation; heart & muscle function osteoporosis, bone spurs, muscle cramps, rheumatism 200-1500 mg barley, kale, unrefined grains; milk, green veggies Prolonged excess may cause a mineral imbalance.

*Magnesium

energy processes, nerve function, enzyme activation stress, senility, osteoporosis, insomnia 150-600 mg avocados, almonds, whole grains, grapefruit Doses over 400 mg can cause diarrhea in some people.

Potassium

pH balance, nerve function stress, atherosclerosis, high blood pressure 1800-5625* mg * a normal diet should contain sufficient potassium potato peel, bananas, beans, almonds, whole grains Do not take high supplemental doses (food Sources are O.K.) when taking heart medicine without physician guidance.

Sodium

pH balance, nerve function Excess is more common and is assoc with high blood pressure limit daily intake to 1,500 mg okra, celery, black mission figs Very few people (athletes, diarrhea /vomiting) need to supplement.

Phosphorus

energy production, bones/teeth, B Vit. activation tooth/gum disorders, impotence, equilibrium 300-600 mg barley, beans, fish, lentils, dark green veggies Prolonged, large doses can cause calcium deficiency or mineral imbalance.

Iron

Red Blood cell production dizziness, depression, anemia 10-30 mg blackberries, cherries, spinach Do NOT take iron unless told to do so by your doctor. Iron excess is associated with health problems.

*Zinc

co-factor in numerous metabolic processes prostate enlargement, immune deficiency; atherosclerosis 15-50 mg wheat germ, wheat bran, pumpkin seed, avocado, sea food Large doses (50mg, day) can cause a copper deficiency & other mineral imbalances.

*Copper

Red blood cell production; skeletal, heart & muscle function osteoporosis, digestive function, nerve disorders 2-3 mg green leafy veggies, almonds, beans, sea food Higher doses can be toxic.

*Manganese

glandular function, bone & ligament health  diabetes, asthma, digestive disturbance 2-10 mg nuts, seeds, avocados, grapefruit, apricots High doses may create other mineral imbalances.

*Chromium

glucose metabolism; blood sugar regulation; heart function atherosclerosis, diabetes, hypoglycemia, high cholesterol, overweight 200-500 mcg whole grain cereals, molasses, meat, yeast Nontoxic at therapeutic levels.

*Selenium

antioxidant, synergistic with vitamin E cancer prevention; aging 100-200 mcg bran, whole grains, tuna, broccoli, onion Prolonged excess may be toxic. * indicates minerals most often deficient in the diet. Other minerals not marked with a * usually do not need to be supplemented. Other minerals and trace minerals include: molybdenum, flourine, chlorine, cobalt, silicon, boron, sulphur, vanadium

ACCESSORY NUTRIENTS

Bioflavonoids – compounds found in most plants in association with vitamin C. Bioflavonoids are potent antioxidants. Higher dietary levels are useful in heart disease and atherosclerosis, bleeding gums, weak immune system, inflammation, varicose veins, hayfever.

CoQ10 – (ubiquinone) A naturally-occurring compound in the human body that is a vital co-factor in energy production. Conditions benefited by increased CoQ10 levels include: cardiovascular disease, angina, congestive heart failure, mitral valve prolapse, immune deficiency, obesity, diabetes, periodontal disease, cancer, muscular dystrophy. Also use in longevity and rejuvenation programs.

Fiber – Plant cell walls present in whole grains, legumes, fruits and vegetables. This part of the plant is usually lost in processing. Fiber deficiency is associated with numerous illnesses: obesity, atherosclerosis, diabetes, gallstones, varicose veins, constipation, diverticulosis, irritable bowel, colon cancer, high blood pressure and high cholesterol.

FOS (fructooligosaccharides) Naturally- occurring sugar-like substances that act as food to friendly GI bacteria. In human body cells, this substance is not utilized as energy (or as a true sugar), but to probiotic gut bacteria, FOS is a banquet. The addition of FOS to probiotic formulas (as in Enterogenic concentrate, product # 218), helps good bacteria re-colonize the GI tract faster and more plentifully.

Friendly bacteria – (probiotics) The naturally-occurring bacteria of the colon help protect us from many conditions, including candidiasis, allergies, constipation, B12 vitamin deficiency. These good bacteria are damaged or destroyed by dietary imbalances, antibiotic and other drug use. Replacement of good bacteria results in improved colon function.

Glucosamine sulfate – A naturally occurring substance that has been found to be highly effective in treating osteoarthritis. It acts both to reduce pain and to stimulate joint repair.

5-Hydroxy-Tryptophan-(5-HTP)
5-HTP is the intermediate metabolite of the amino acid L-tryptophan. This amino acid intermediate participates in the body’s production of serotonin. It also stimulates increased endorphin, melatonin, norepinephrine and dopamine production. These brain chemicals (neuro-transmitters) help increase energy, improve mood and sleep, and decrease appetite. Useful for insomnia, mood disorder (anxiety/depression) and weight loss programs.

L-Carnitine – an amino acid that is crucial to normal energy production and fat metabolism. Carnitine has been shown to benefit atherosclerotic heart disease and high cholesterol and triglycerides. Improves fat metabolism throughout the body.

L-Glutathione – A tri peptide (3 amino acids) that acts as a potent antioxidant in the body. Supplementation is useful in allergies, cancer prevention, liver detoxification, cataracts, heavy metal toxicity, longevity and rejuvenation.

Omega-3 Oils are derived from fatty fish and flax seeds. These fatty acids are anti-inflammatory and have a positive effect on cardiovascular disease, including high cholesterol and high blood pressure, allergic and inflammatory conditions (including psoriasis and eczema), autoimmune diseases, cancer, neurological disease, menopause, general health enhancement.

Omega-6 Oils found in evening primrose, black currant, borage and a number of vegetable oils. Although supplementation is popular, these oils increase arachadonic acid levels (an inflammatory substance). Only diabetics need to supplement very small doses of this oil. (less than 500mg/day).

SMOKING…….JUST THE FACTS

  • Smoking weakens the immune system by inhibiting cellular immunity.
  • Tobacco smoke contains carbon monoxide, a substance that is toxic to the brain.
  • Tobacco smoking is associated with a higher incidence of gingivitis and tooth loss.
  • Tobacco smoke contains cadmium, a heavy metal that can cause high blood pressure, kidney stones, and other toxic symptoms.
  • Tobacco smoke induces the formation of free radicals – highly reactive molecules that can bind to normal, healthy cells and destroy them.
  • Smokers have a higher incidence of peptic ulcer disease, a decreased response to anti-ulcer medications, and a higher mortality from peptic ulcer.
  • Female smokers are at higher risk of developing osteoporosis.
  • Female smokers are at higher risk for premature menopause.
  • Smoking accelerates skin aging and wrinkle formation.
  • Smoking causes a decrease in penile blood flow and can cause impotence in males.
  • Smokers have a three to five-fold increase in coronary artery disease compared to non-smokers.
  • Smoking is associated with the development of urinary tract cancer, bowel cancer, pancreatic cancer, cervical and uterine cancer – and yes, lung cancer.
  • Smoking is a potent risk factor for atherosclerosis.
  • 40% of heavy smokers die before they reach retirement age.
  • Nicotine causes adrenaline release, which can cause anxiety, heart palpitations, diarrhea, and high blood pressure.
  • Hydrogen cyanide, a chemical in tobacco smoke, causes inflammation of the bronchi which leads to bronchitis. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema often eventually result.
  • The adrenal stimulation caused by nicotine can aggravate hypoglycemia. Eventually, adrenal exhaustion results.
  • The American Lung Association reports that 350,000 Americans die each year from cigarette smoking. This is more than the combined deaths from illegal drugs, traffic accidents, suicide, homicide, and alcohol.

Don’t Kid Yourself.
Smoking tobacco is incompatible with a healthy lifestyle.

 

Vitamin D A Special HealthBeat News Report



Vitamin D – You have been reading about it in the news, and you have wondered what is real and what is hype.

Dr. Myatt and Nurse Mark have researched and prepared this special report for HealthBeat News Readers.


Vitamin D — The Short Course

1.) Vit D is produced in our bodies in response to sun exposure. Vit D is also available from food and supplements.

2.) Vit D is FAR more important to health than was previously realized. I’m talking FAR more important.

3.) Vit D deficiency is widespread, including North America, even in sunny climates like Arizona. Many people who think they are getting enough Vitamin D from sunlight are mistaken.

4.) How to Optimize Vit D Levels for Good Health:

I.)  Vit D test, supplement accordingly, re-test

II.) Supplement at 5,000IU for 3 months, then test your levels.

III.) Don’t test, run the risk of being deficient, but take at least 2,000IU total per day. (This is still an extremely conservative dose, but much higher than the RDA of 400IU which hasn’t been changed yet to reflect the newer findings about Vit D). 

5.) Natural ways to obtain Vit D: Foods, supplements and sun exposure.


Vitamin D — Nutrient of the Decade: Are You Getting Enough?

The Consequences of Low Vitamin D

Vitamin D is called “the sunshine Vitamin” because our bodies make it in response to sun exposure.

Vit D is necessary for normal bone formation in both children and adults. In children, deficiencies of Vit D lead to rickets. In adults, deficiencies are associated with osteoporosis and osteomalacia (soft bones), decreased muscle strength and increased risk of fall. (1,12,14,22,43-48)Until recently, the bone-protecting effect was  about all that Vit D was known for, but the past decade of medical research has changed all that.

The newly appreciated Vitamin D deficiency risks include:

1.) heart disease: myocardial infarction, high blood pressure, heart failure, myopathy, sudden cardiac death, stroke (11,13-26, 30, 49-50)

2.) blood sugar problems: glucose intolerance, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome (13-14,19,23-24,27-29)

3.) cancer prevention and improved cancer survival rates (7,8,11,14,15,24,31-37)

4.) upper respiratory tract infections, influenza and tuberculosis (24,30,38)

5.) cognitive impairment and low mood (38-40)

6.) autoimmune disease (multiple sclerosis, RA, systemic lupus erythromatosis (SLE) (15,24,26,29,30,32,41,42)

7.) misc. diseases: psoriasis, polycystic ovarian syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease

8.) urinary incontinence (54)

9.) and all-cause mortality! (5,6,7,24,30,51)

How “significant” are these associations? Here are some of the conclusions of various studies and meta-analyses (lots of studies looked at together) concerning Vit D. Italics are mine for emphasis.

“Research strongly supports the view … Vitamin D status would have significant protective effects against the development of cancer …. cancers of the breast, colon, prostate, ovary, lungs, and pancreas…” (8)

“High levels of Vitamin D among middle-age and elderly populations are associated with a substantial decrease in cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome.” (9)

“Low levels of [Vitamin D] are independently predictive for fatal strokes” (10)

“It is estimated that there is a 30 to 50% reduction in risk for developing colorectal, breast, and prostate cancer by either increasing Vitamin D intake or increasing sun exposure…” (11)

“Oral Vitamin D supplementation between 700 to 800 IU/d appears to reduce the risk of hip and any nonvertebral fractures in ambulatory or institutionalized elderly persons” (12)

” 28 studies including 99,745 participants … highest levels of serum [Vit D] were associated with a 43% reduction in cardiometabolic disorders (cardiovascular disease, diabetes and metabolic syndrome) …” (9)

Are Your Vitamin D Levels Optimal? (Vitamin D Deficiency is Widespread)

One billion people worldwide are estimated to be Vit D deficient, and the problem affects us here in the United States as well. (2) One study found that more than half of North American women receiving drugs for prevention or treatment of osteoporosis were Vitamin D deficient. (1) Another study found 48% of pre-adolescent girls to be Vit D deficient (3). Other studies have found that 40% to 100% of older men and women in both the United States and Europe are Vitamin D deficient.[2] Because of the importance of Vit D and how widespread Vit D deficiency is, an estimated $100 to $200 billion is spent (wasted) each year on diseases which may really just be Vitamin D deficiencies. [4]

Age, overweight, dark skin color, use of sunscreen, and overprotection from the sun’s rays are causes of decreased production of Vit D in response to sunlight. (52,52)

How Much Vitamin D Should You Take?

Ideally, you should take whatever amount of Vitamin D puts you in the “optimal” range. Since the amount will be highly variable depending on age, sex, race, weight, daily sun exposure and diet, there is no “one size fits all” answer. Instead, blood testing of Vitamin D levels and increasing intake until optimal levels are reached is the surest way to obtain optimal concentrations of Vitamin D in the body.

Deficiency Insufficiency Sufficiency * Optimal Excess (Toxicity) <20ng/ml 20-32ng/ml 32-100ng/ml 40-80ng/ml > 150ng/ml

* – conventional medicine says that 30 ng/ml is “sufficient.” Chart references (59-62)

At the wellness Club we believe the most accurate and effective way to embark on a program of Vit D supplementation is to perform a Vit D test, supplement Vit D in accordance with the results, and then re-test in 3 months at which time your daily doses of Vit D can be fine-tuned for maintenance. March (right now!) is the best time to test initially because Vit. D stores tend to be lowest in this month.

The Vitamin D Council, a non-profit group dedicated to Vitamin D research and education recommends people take 5,000 IU per day for 2-3 months, then perform a Vitamin D test. They then suggest adjusting the dosage so that blood levels are between 50-80 ng/mL (or 125-200 nM/L) year-round. (55)

Alternately, some people opt to supplement without knowing their initial Vit D levels. A dose of 2000IU is quite conservative but certainly safe for almost anyone. In cases of significant Vit D deficiency conservative dosing such as this may take considerable time to rebuild healthy stores of this important Vitamin.

For those who wish to calculate their own Vit D requirements, 100 IU of Vitamin D could be expected to raise blood level of 25(OH)D by 1 ng/ml. (11)

Can too much Vitamin D can be toxic? Research shows that massive doses may eventually cause toxicity. One source found that in adults a sustained intake of 50,000 IU daily could produce toxicity within a few months (58) and 40,000 IU per day in infants has been shown to produce toxicity within 1 to 4 months. (56) That is ten times the recommended dose for each of those age groups! Vitamin D testing is good insurance that will allow you to safely fine-tune your dosage to your actual needs. Be careful though, since not all testing is the same and lab references and standards vary – be sure that you are comparing “apples to apples” and obtaining useable results when you are tested.

The 25-hydroxyVitamin D blood test (25(OH)D blood test) is a test that measures the amount of calcidiol circulating in the blood. This is the most accurate measure of the amount of Vitamin D in the body. The Wellness Club offers Vitamin D testing – performed by a lab that adheres to standardized references and values so that you know what you are getting when you receive your results. This can is performed at home with a “spot” (finger stick) blood test. Other tests that require a blood draw are also available.

How to Get to Your Optimal Vitamin D Levels

Start Vitamin D supplementation eight to twelve weeks before testing. Dr. John Cannell of the Vitamin D Council suggests a starting dose of 1,000 IU per 25 pounds of body weight. For example, a 150 pound person would take 6,000 IU Vitamin D per day. (150 divided by 25 = 6; 1,000IU x 6 = 6,000). Maintain this dose for 8-12 weeks, then test.

This dose may or may not put you in the optimal target range, but it certainly won’t put you in any “toxic” range. Remember, most adults can safely take up to 10,000IU per day and still be far away from Vitamin D toxicity which typically appears at 40,000-50,000IU taken for several months.

Although this dose should theoretically put you in an optimal range, numerous personal variations alter Vitamin D requirements. Some people will need a higher dose than this calculation affords. However, taking the calculated dose should at least put you “in the ballpark” for optimal dosing.

When you test results come back, you can use the number to help you know whether or not you need to increase your Vit D dose and by how much. It is estimated that each 1,000 IU increase in supplemental Vitamin D will generally produce a 10 ng/ml increase in the Vitamin D blood level (8). If your test result shows that you are 10ng/ml below your target, increase daily Vit D intake by 1,000IU per day for a total of 7,000IU per day from the above example. Continue this dose and re-test in another 3 months to verify that you are now in your optimal range.

Congratulations! You have found your optimal daily Vitamin D intake needed to maintain optimal Vitamin D blood levels.

How to Obtain Vitamin D Naturally

Exposure to sun is the most natural way to boost Vit D levels. Medical scientists have found that the skin produces approximately 10,000 IU of Vitamin D in response to as little as 30 minutes of unprotected summer sun exposure. (57)

Vitamin D can be obtained from food too. Since rickets in children is such a crippling but preventable condition, governments have long encouraged the “fortification” of dairy products and breads and cereals with token amounts of Vitamin D. In the United States and Canada, for example, fortified milk typically provides 100 IU per glass.

It is difficult to obtain optimal levels of Vitamin D from food alone.

Food IUs per serving* Percent DV** Cod liver oil, 1 tablespoon 1,360 340 Salmon (sockeye), cooked, 3 ounces 794 199 Mushrooms that have been exposed to ultraviolet light to increase vitamin D, 3 ounces (not yet commonly available) 400 100 Mackerel, cooked, 3 ounces 388 97 Tuna fish, canned in water, drained, 3 ounces 154 39 Milk, nonfat, reduced fat, and whole, vitamin D-fortified, 1 cup 115-124 29-31 Orange juice fortified with vitamin D, 1 cup (check product labels, as amount of added vitamin D varies) 100 25 Yogurt, fortified with 20% of the DV for vitamin D, 6 ounces (more heavily fortified yogurts provide more of the DV) 80 20 Margarine, fortified, 1 tablespoon 60 15 Sardines, canned in oil, drained, 2 sardines 46 12 Liver, beef, cooked, 3.5 ounces 46 12 Ready-to-eat cereal, fortified with 10% of the DV for vitamin D, 0.75-1 cup (more heavily fortified cereals might provide more of the DV) 40 10 Egg, 1 whole (vitamin D is found in yolk) 25 6 Cheese, Swiss, 1 ounce 6 2 *IUs = International Units.

**DV = Daily Value. DVs were developed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to help consumers compare the nutrient contents of products within the context of a total diet. The DV for vitamin D is 400 IU for adults and children age 4 and older. Food labels, however, are not required to list vitamin D content unless a food has been fortified with this nutrient.

Table courtesy of the U.S. Government National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements

Although cod liver oil is high in Vitamin D, it is also high in Vitamin A which interferes with Vit D uptake, so cod liver oil is not the best supplemental form of Vit D. Keep daily intake of pre-formed Vitamin A to a maximum of 5,000IU per day so as not to interfere with Vitamin D absorption. Beta carotene does not appear to interfere with Vit. D uptake.

Vegetarians need to be sure they are getting plenty of sunshine, because other than tiny amounts that may be found in UV-irradiated mushrooms, there are no vegetable sources of Vitamin D.

The Bottom Line on Vitamin D

Achieving Optimal Vitamin D  levels appears to be one of the most important things we can do for our overall health and life expectancy.

Please click on the image below enjoy an interesting and instructive video which discusses the relationship between Vitamin D and Cancer.

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References

1.) Holick MF, Siris ES, Binkley N, et al. Prevalence of Vitamin D inadequacy among postmenopausal North American women receiving osteoporosis therapy. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2005;90: 3215-3224.
2.) Holick MF. Vitamin D deficiency. N Engl J Med. 2007;357:266-281.
3.) Sullivan SS, Rosen CJ, Halteman WA, Chen TC, Holick MF. Adolescent girls in Maine at risk for Vitamin D insufficiency. J Am Diet Assoc. 2005;105:971-974.
4.) GrassrootsHealth. The Vitamin D deficiency epidemic. A call to D*action. http://www.grassrootshealth.org/daction/epidemic.php. Accessed May 8, 2009.
5.) GrassrootsHealth. Disease incidence prevention by serum 25(OH)D level. http://www.grassrootshealth.org/_download/disease_incidence_prev_chart_101608.pdf. Accessed May 8, 2009.
6.) Autier P, Gandini S. Vitamin D supplementation and total mortality. Arch Intern Med. 2007;167(16):1730-1737.
7.) Thomas L. Lenz. Vitamin D Supplementation and Cancer Prevention. Am J Lifestyle Med. 2009;3(5):365-368.
8.) Ingraham BA, Bragdon B, Nohe A. Molecular basis of the potential of Vitamin D to prevent cancer. Curr Med Res Opin. 2008 Jan;24(1):139-49.
9.) Parker J, Hashmi O, Dutton D, Mavrodaris A, Stranges S, Kandala NB, Clarke A, Franco OH. Levels of Vitamin D and cardiometabolic disorders: systematic review and meta-analysis. Maturitas. 2010 Mar;65(3):225-36. Epub 2009 Dec 23.
10.) Pilz S, Dobnig H, Fischer JE, Wellnitz B, Seelhorst U, Boehm BO, März W. Low Vitamin d levels predict stroke in patients referred to coronary angiography. Stroke. 2008 Sep;39(9):2611-3. Epub 2008 Jul 17.
11.) Holick MF. Vitamin D and sunlight: strategies for cancer prevention and other health benefits. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2008 Sep;3(5):1548-54. Epub 2008 Jun 11.
12.) Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Willett WC, Wong JB, Giovannucci E, Dietrich T, Dawson-Hughes B. Fracture prevention with Vitamin D supplementation: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. JAMA. 2005 May 11;293(18):2257-64.
13.) Anagnostis P, Athyros VG, Adamidou F, Florentin M, Karagiannis A. Vitamin D and Cardiovascular Disease: A Novel Agent for Reducing Cardiovascular Risk ? Curr Vasc Pharmacol. 2010 Feb 25. [Epub ahead of print]
14.) Holick MF. Vitamin D: importance in the prevention of cancers, type 1 diabetes, heart disease, and osteoporosis. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Mar;79(3):362-71.
15.) Holick MF. Vitamin D and sunlight: strategies for cancer prevention and other health benefits. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2008 Sep;3(5):1548-54. Epub 2008 Jun 11.
16.) Judd SE, Tangpricha V. Vitamin D deficiency and risk for cardiovascular disease. Am J Med Sci. 2009 Jul;338(1):40-4.
17.) Kendrick J, Targher G, Smits G, Chonchol M.25-HydroxyVitamin D deficiency is independently associated with cardiovascular disease in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Atherosclerosis. 2009 Jul;205(1):255-60. Epub 2008 Nov 11.
18.) Lee W, Kang PM. Vitamin D deficiency and cardiovascular disease: Is there a role for Vitamin D therapy in heart failure? Curr Opin Investig Drugs. 2010 Mar;11(3):309-14.
19.) Martins D, Wolf M, Pan D, Zadshir A, Tareen N, Thadhani R, Felsenfeld A, Levine B, Mehrotra R, Norris K. Prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and the serum levels of 25-hydroxyVitamin D in the United States: data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Arch Intern Med. 2007 Jun 11;167(11):1159-65.
20.) McConnell JP, Foley KF, Vargas GM. HypoVitaminosis D: a new risk marker for cardiovascular disease. Clin Lab Sci. 2009 Fall;22(4):240-6.
21.) Mertens PR, Müller R. Vitamin D and cardiovascular risk. Int Urol Nephrol. 2009 Dec 29. [Epub ahead of print]
22.) Murlikiewicz K, Zawiasa A, Nowicki M. Vitamin D–a panacea in nephrology and beyond] Pol Merkur Lekarski. 2009 Nov;27(161):437-41.{article in Polish]
23.) Parker J, Hashmi O, Dutton D, Mavrodaris A, Stranges S, Kandala NB, Clarke A, Franco OH. Levels of Vitamin D and cardiometabolic disorders: systematic review and meta-analysis. Maturitas. 2010 Mar;65(3):225-36. Epub 2009 Dec 23.
24.) Pilz S, Dobnig H, Nijpels G, Heine RJ, Stehouwer CD, Snijder MB, van Dam RM, Dekker JM. Vitamin D and mortality in older men and women. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2009 Nov;71(5):666-72. Epub 2009 Feb 18.
25.) Pilz S, März W, Wellnitz B, Seelhorst U, Fahrleitner-Pammer A, Dimai HP, Boehm BO, Dobnig H. Association of Vitamin D deficiency with heart failure and sudden cardiac death in a large cross-sectional study of patients referred for coronary angiography. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2008 Oct;93(10):3927-35. Epub 2008 Aug 5.
26.) Wu PW, Rhew EY, Dyer AR, Dunlop DD, Langman CB, Price H, Sutton-Tyrrell K, McPherson DD, Edmundowicz D, Kondos GT, Ramsey-Goldman R. 25-hydroxyVitamin D and cardiovascular risk factors in women with systemic lupus erythematosus. Arthritis Rheum. 2009 Oct 15;61(10):1387-95.
27.) Baz-Hecht M, Goldfine AB. The impact of Vitamin D deficiency on diabetes and cardiovascular risk. Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes. 2010 Apr;17(2):113-9.
28.) Cheng S, Massaro JM, Fox CS, Larson MG, Keyes MJ, McCabe EL, Robins SJ, O’Donnell CJ, Hoffmann U, Jacques PF, Booth SL, Vasan RS, Wolf M, Wang TJ. Adiposity, cardiometabolic risk, and Vitamin D status: the Framingham Heart Study. Diabetes. 2010 Jan;59(1):242-8. Epub 2009 Oct 15.
29.) Holick MF. Sunlight and Vitamin D for bone health and prevention of autoimmune diseases, cancers, and cardiovascular disease. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Dec;80(6 Suppl):1678S-88S.
30.) Ginde AA, Scragg R, Schwartz RS, Camargo CA Jr. Prospective study of serum 25-hydroxyVitamin D level, cardiovascular disease mortality, and all-cause mortality in older U.S. adults. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2009 Sep;57(9):1595-603. Epub 2009 Jun 22.
31.) Grant WB. How strong is the evidence that solar ultraviolet B and Vitamin D reduce the risk of cancer?: An examination using Hill’s criteria for causality. Dermatoendocrinol. 2009 Jan;1(1):17-24.
32.) Holick MF, Chen TC. Vitamin D deficiency: a worldwide problem with health consequences. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Apr;87(4):1080S-6S.
33.) Holick MF. Vitamin D: its role in cancer prevention and treatment. Prog Biophys Mol Biol. 2006 Sep;92(1):49-59. Epub 2006 Mar 10.
34.) Ingraham BA, Bragdon B, Nohe A. Molecular basis of the potential of Vitamin D to prevent cancer. Curr Med Res Opin. 2008 Jan;24(1):139-49.
35.) Pilz S, Dobnig H, Winklhofer-Roob B, Riedmüller G, Fischer JE, Seelhorst U, Wellnitz B, Boehm BO, März W. Low serum levels of 25-hydroxyVitamin D predict fatal cancer in patients referred to coronary angiography. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008 May;17(5):1228-33. Epub 2008 May 7.
36.) Pilz S, Tomaschitz A, Obermayer-Pietsch B, Dobnig H, Pieber TR. Epidemiology of Vitamin D insufficiency and cancer mortality. Anticancer Res. 2009 Sep;29(9):3699-704.
37.) Ginde AA, Mansbach JM, Camargo CA Jr. Association between serum 25-hydroxyVitamin D level and upper respiratory tract infection in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Arch Intern Med. 2009 Feb 23;169(4):384-90.
38.) Annweiler C, Schott AM, Allali G, Bridenbaugh SA, Kressig RW, Allain P, Herrmann FR, Beauchet O. Association of Vitamin D deficiency with cognitive impairment in older women: cross-sectional study. Neurology. 2010 Jan 5;74(1):27-32. Epub 2009 Sep 30.
39.) Cherniack EP, Troen BR, Florez HJ, Roos BA, Levis S. Some new food for thought: the role of Vitamin D in the mental health of older adults. Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2009 Feb;11(1):12-9.
40.) Wilkins CH, Sheline YI, Roe CM, Birge SJ, Morris JC. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with low mood and worse cognitive performance in older adults. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2006 Dec;14(12):1032-40.
41.) Cutolo M, Otsa K. Review: Vitamin D, immunity and lupus. Lupus. 2008;17(1):6-10.
42.) Kamen DL, Cooper GS, Bouali H, Shaftman SR, Hollis BW, Gilkeson GS. Vitamin D deficiency in systemic lupus erythematosus. Autoimmun Rev. 2006 Feb;5(2):114-7. Epub 2005 Jun 21.
43.) Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Willett WC, Wong JB, Giovannucci E, Dietrich T, Dawson-Hughes B. Fracture prevention with Vitamin D supplementation: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. JAMA. 2005 May 11;293(18):2257-64.
44.) Bischoff HA, Stähelin HB, Tyndall A, Theiler R. Relationship between muscle strength and Vitamin D metabolites: are there therapeutic possibilities in the elderly? Z Rheumatol. 2000;59 Suppl 1:39-41.
45.) DIPART (Vitamin D Individual Patient Analysis of Randomized Trials) Group. Patient level pooled analysis of 68 500 patients from seven major Vitamin D fracture trials in US and Europe. BMJ. 2010 Jan 12;340:b5463. doi: 10.1136/bmj.b5463.
46.) Houston DK, Cesari M, Ferrucci L, Cherubini A, Maggio D, Bartali B, Johnson MA, Schwartz GG, Kritchevsky SB. Association between Vitamin D status and physical performance: the InCHIANTI study. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2007 Apr;62(4):440-6.
47.) Kwon J, Suzuki T, Yoshida H, Kim H, Yoshida Y, Iwasa H. Concomitant lower serum albumin and Vitamin D levels are associated with decreased objective physical performance among Japanese community-dwelling elderly. Gerontology. 2007;53(5):322-8. Epub 2007 May 29.
48.) Pfeifer M, Begerow B, Minne HW. Vitamin D and muscle function. Osteoporos Int. 2002 Mar;13(3):187-94.
49.) Judd SE, Nanes MS, Ziegler TR, Wilson PW, Tangpricha V. Optimal Vitamin D status attenuates the age-associated increase in systolic blood pressure in white Americans: results from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jan;87(1):136-41.
50.) Pilz S, Dobnig H, Fischer JE, Wellnitz B, Seelhorst U, Boehm BO, März W. Low Vitamin d levels predict stroke in patients referred to coronary angiography. Stroke. 2008 Sep;39(9):2611-3. Epub 2008 Jul 17.
51.) Melamed ML, Michos ED, Post W, Astor B.25-hydroxyVitamin D levels and the risk of mortality in the general population. Arch Intern Med. 2008 Aug 11;168(15):1629-37.
52.) Jacobs ET, Alberts DS, Foote JA, Green SB, Hollis BW, Yu Z, Martínez ME. Vitamin D insufficiency in southern Arizona. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Mar;87(3):608-13.
53.) Park S, Johnson MA. Living in low-latitude regions in the United States does not prevent poor Vitamin D status. Nutr Rev. 2005 Jun;63(6 Pt 1):203-9.
54.) Low Vitamin D Levels Tied to Incontinence. WebMD March 22, 2010 http://www.webmd.com/urinary-incontinence-oab/news/20100322/low-Vitamin-d-linked-incontinence.
55.) The Vitamin D Council. Vitamin D Council
56.) Wikipedia: Vitamin D. Wikipedia Vitamine D
57.) Holick MF. Environmental factors thatinfluence the cutaneous production of Vitamin D. Am J Clin Nutr. 1995 Mar;61(3 Suppl):638S-645S.
58.) Vieth R. Vitamin D supplementation, 25-hydroxyVitamin D concentrations, and safety. Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 May;69(5):842-56.
59.) Holick MF. Vitamin D deficiency. N Engl J Med. 2007;357:266-281.
60.) GrassrootsHealth. Disease incidence prevention by serum 25(OH)D level.Grassroots Heaalth. Accessed May 8, 2009.
61.) Dall T, Anderson J. Vitamin D: merging research into clinical lipid practice. Lipid Spin. 2008;6(3):4-8.
62.) Heaney RP. What is a Vitamin D deficiency?Grassroots Health Vitamin D deficiency. Accessed May 8, 2009.

 

 

Potassium Iodide

Potassium Iodide (KI) Can Shield You From Thyroid Cancer

ARE YOU PREPARED FOR A RADIATION EMERGENCY?

With over 100 active commercial nuclear reactors in the United States, we live in constant threat of a nuclear emergency every day. A terrorist attack on any one of these facilities, or the release of a “dirty bomb” is also a possibility in today’s “highly charged” world. In fact, in an emergency, if you live within 200 miles of a nuclear reactor, you have a high risk of being exposed to significant doses of radioactive isotopes. In the event of a nuclear accident or attack radioactive materials can be released into the atmosphere, a high percentage of which is radioactive iodine. When a radioactive iodine cloud passes through a populated area, the radiation is concentrated into the thyroid gland of those exposed. The result is irreparable damage to the thyroid, which can lead to cancer. The 1986 Chernobyl accident in the Ukraine is a tragic example as is the Fukushima tragedy in Japan.

Even reactors in other countries can have adverse effects on people in the United States as prevailing winds can quickly spread the radioactive particulate matter from nuclear disasters.

The best protection against thyroid damage and thyroid cancer induced by radioactive iodine exposure is Potassium Iodide. This simple compound protects the thyroid by saturating all of the iodine binding sites in the gland, leaving no room for the binding of radioactive iodine. Potassium Iodide is a low-cost way to protect yourself and your family against the long-term consequences of exposure to radiation. When used correctly, potassium iodide tablets can prevent or reduce the amount of radioactive iodine taken up by the thyroid gland. Even the government and the military stocks up on potassium iodide in case of nuclear disaster.

The body can’t distinguish between radioactive and the benign version of iodine, which is necessary for thyroid function. Taking 130 mg of potassium iodide, the dosage widely recommended for the blocking of radioactive iodine in the event of a nuclear disaster, can quickly and completely protect the thyroid gland, which is one of the organs most commonly damaged by radioactive fallout.

It is important to remember that the precise dose of Potassium Iodide, whether it is 130mg or 125mg or 150mg (for a full-sized adult) is less critical than just simply offering the thyroid a good dose that will allow it to ignore the radioactive iodine that a person may have been exposed to.

Many Americans are cronically “undernourished” with iodine – iodine deficiency is common in North America. The FDA and CDC and other government agencies acknowledge this implicitly by recommending the use of Potassium Iodide in a radiation emergency since a thyroid gland that is not iodine deficient will not be prone to take up radioactive iodine.

Dr. Myatt’s Wellness Club offers a selection of supplements that contain potassium iodide.

Tablets are scored for easy breakage in the case of any need for exact or reduced dosages as recommended for children and pets.

How much do you need? The FDA recommends that you have one 130mg dose per person available for immediate use and up to 14 additional 130mg doses available for continuing use if needed.

Here is what the FDA recommends:

 What doses of potassium iodide (KI) should be taken for specific exposure levels?

Exposures greater than 5 cGy:
Birth through 1 mo.  – 16 mg.
1 mo. through 3 yrs.  – 32 mg.
3 yrs through 18 yrs.  – 65 mg. (Adolescents>150 pounds should take adult dose.)

Exposures greater than 10 cGy:
18 yrs through 40 yrs. – 130 mg

Exposures greater than 500 cGy:
Adults over 40 yrs – 130 mg.

7.  How long should potassium iodide (KI) be taken?

Since KI protects for approximately 24 hours, it should be dosed daily until the risk no longer exists.  Priority with regard to evacuation and sheltering should be given to pregnant females and neonates because of the potential for KI to suppress thyroid function in the fetus and neonate.  Unless other protective measures are not available, we do not recommend repeat dosing in pregnant females and neonates.

Remember that during an emergency, you may not be able to get to your home, thus it is recommended to have potassium iodide tablets stored in several places as well. Since the shelf life of this product is virtually unlimited, you should have to purchase your supply only once. Have this on hand for your family, and remember the children, pets, grandchildren, too!

Iodine for Radiation Protection

Iodoral – The Most Trusted Brand Of Natural Iodine

Iodoral (Iodine) For Healthy Thyroid FunctionIodoral® iodine tablets contain both iodine and iodide as the potassium salt. The preparation is absorbed into colloidal silica to prevent gastric irritation and specially coated with a thin film of pharmaceutical glaze to eliminate unpleasant taste.

Recommended Dose for daily use: 12.5 mg tablets – 1-2 tablets, 1-2 times per day as determined by iodine testing. A retest is suggested after 3 months. Best taken in the morning and afternoon to avoid nighttime stimulation.

Once whole body iodine sufficiency is achieved, Iodoral® maintenance dose is typically 1-4 tablets daily. People with thyroid disorders should work closely with their holistic physician or other health care professional.

NOTE: People with known iodine sensitivity should NOT use this product!

To make it easy to be prepared for a Radiation Emergency Dr. Myatt has Iodoral available:


Product # 309 Iodoral -90 tablets per bottle; 12.5mg iodine/iodide per tablet. $29.95


A More Convenient Product Is Also Available For Your Preparedness Kit:

Potassium Iodide Emergency Packs

Inexpensive protection – Click here to learn More.


Also Valuable for your Radiation Protection kit:

Modifilan (Laminaria japonica)

Thyroid and Immune Stimulant, Detoxification and Energizing Aid from the Sea

ModifilanThis “herb” (a variety of seaweed) might be the most important natural health discovery of the decade!

Modifilan was reportedly developed in Russia by scientists at the State Rehabilitation Institute, where victims of the Chernobyl nuclear catastrophe underwent treatment.

Hand-harvested from far Northern Pacific waters, Laminaria kelp has numerous health properties that set it apart from other species of seaweed.

Beneficial substances found in Modifilan include:

  • Organic iodine: Organic iodine feeds the thyroid gland, promoting normal metabolism and glandular function.
  • Fucoidan: a polysaccharide that promotes cancer cell death (apoptosis) and stimulates the immune system in animal studies. (1-4)
  • Laminarin: a polysaccharide that improves gut health in animal studies.(5)
  • Fucoxanthin: a natural pigment in the carotenoid family, is a potent antioxidant.(6-11)
  • Alginate: a natural polysaccharide that binds water and chelates radioactive toxins such as iodine-131 and strontium-90.(12-14)

Modifilan may be useful for:

  • Boosting the immune system with anti-viral and anti-cancer properties. (1-4, 15-21)
  • Helping lower blood sugar and cholesterol levels. (22-23)
  • Detoxifying the body from heavy metals, radioactive elements, free radicals and toxins.(12-14)
  • Aiding weight loss by improving thyroid, metabolism and GI-tract function.(24-25)
  • Helping smokers detoxify from heavy metals including strontium and cadmium.(12-14)

It takes 40 pounds or raw seaweed (conscientiously harvested to protect habitat) to make one pound of Modifilan.

Put some “pep in your step,” stimulate weight loss and energy while improving your immune system. This specially processed Laminaria is truly a unique gift from the sea.

Dr. Myatt’s Comment: Many of the “anti-cancer” and immune claims for Modifilan and other seaweed products have not yet been substantiated in humans. However, Modifilan is an excellent source of organic iodine and should be considered by anyone with low thyroid function.

Suggested dose:

For general health maintenance, 4-6 capsules per day.
For heavy metal chelation: 12 capsules per day.
For cancer: as directed by your physician (usually 6-12 capsules per day in divided doses).

#844 Modifilan (90 Caps) $29.97

Enter Quantity Desired and Click “Add To Cart” Button

References:

Potassium Iodide:

Food and Drug Administration (FDA) final Guidance on Potassium Iodide as a Thyroid Blocking Agent in Radiation Emergencies.

Food and Drug Administration (FDA) FAQ page on Potassium Iodide

Modifilan:

1.) Funahashi H, Imai T, Mase T, et al. Seaweed prevents breast cancer? Jpn J Cancer Res. 2001;92(5):483-487.
2.) Furusawa E, Furusawa S. Anticancer potential of Viva-Natural, a dietary seaweed extract, on Lewis lung carcinoma in comparison with chemical immunomodulators and on cyclosporine-accelerated AKR leukemia. Oncology. 1989;46(5):343-348.
3.) Itoh H, Noda H, Amano H, et al. Antitumor activity and immunological properties of marine algal polysaccharides, especially fucoidan, prepared from Sargassum thunbergii of Phaeophyceae. Anticancer Res. 1993;13(6A):2045-2052.
4.) Go H, Hwang HJ, Nam TJ. A glycoprotein from Laminaria japonica induces apoptosis in HT-29 colon cancer cells. Toxicol In Vitro. 2010 Sep;24(6):1546-53. Epub 2010 Jul 6.
5.) Lynch MB, Sweeney T, Callan JJ, O’Sullivan JT, O’Doherty JV. The effect of dietary Laminaria-derived laminarin and fucoidan on nutrient digestibility, nitrogen utilisation, intestinal microflora and volatile fatty acid concentration in pigs. J Sci Food Agric. 2010 Feb;90(3):430-7.
6.) Park PJ, Kim EK, Lee SJ, Park SY, Kang DS, Jung BM, Kim KS, Je JY, Ahn CB. Protective effects against H2O2-induced damage by enzymatic hydrolysates of an edible brown seaweed, sea tangle (Laminaria japonica). J Med Food. 2009 Feb;12(1):159-66.
7.) Wang J, Zhang Q, Zhang Z, Li Z. Antioxidant activity of sulfated polysaccharide fractions extracted from Laminaria japonica. Int J Biol Macromol. 2008 Mar 1;42(2):127-32. Epub 2007 Oct 9.
8.) Wang J, Wang F, Zhang Q, Zhang Z, Shi X, Li P. Synthesized different derivatives of low molecular fucoidan extracted from Laminaria japonica and their potential antioxidant activity in vitro. Int J Biol Macromol. 2009 Jun 1;44(5):379-84. Epub 2009 Feb 13.
9.) Wang J, Zhang Q, Zhang Z, Song H, Li P. Potential antioxidant and anticoagulant capacity of low molecular weight fucoidan fractions extracted from Laminaria japonica. Int J Biol Macromol. 2010 Jan 1;46(1):6-12. Epub 2009 Oct 31.
10.) Yan X, Chuda Y, Suzuki M, Nagata T. Fucoxanthin as the major antioxidant in Hijikia fusiformis, a common edible seaweed. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 1999;63:605–7.
11.) Sachindra NM, Sato E, Maeda H, et al. Radical scavenging and singlet oxygen quenching activity of marine carotenoid fucoxanthin and its metabolites. J Agric Food Chem 2007;55:8516–22.
12.) Davis TA, Volesky B, Mucci A. A review of the biochemistry of heavy metal biosorption by brown algae. Water Res. 2003 Nov;37(18):4311-30.
13.) Sutton, A., Harrison, G. E., Carr, T. E., and Barltrop, D. Reduction in the absorption of dietary strontium in children by an alginate derivative. Br. J.Radiol. 44[523], 567. 1971.
14.) Sutton, A., Harrison, B. E., Carr, T. E., and Barltrop, D. Reduction in the absorption of dietary strontium in children by an alginate derivative. Int.J.Radiat.Biol.Relat Stud.Phys.Chem.Med. 19[1], 79-85. 1971
15.) [No authors listed][Production of cytokines by murine bone marrow dendritic cells in vitro mediated by sulfated polysaccharides obtained from sea brown algae].Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2010 Sep-Oct;(5):34-9. [Article in Russian]
16.) Damonte EB, Matulewicz MC, Cerezo AS. Sulfated seaweed polysaccharides as antiviral agents. Curr Med Chem. 2004 Sep;11(18):2399-419.
17.) Gerasimenko NI, Chaĭkina EL, Busarova NG, Anisimov MM. [Antimicrobic and hemolytic activity of low-molecular metabolits of brown seaweed Laminaria cichorioides Miyabe].Prikl Biokhim Mikrobiol. 2010 Jul-Aug;46(4):467-71. [Article in Russian]
18.) Ishikawa C, Tafuku S, Kadekaru T, Sawada S, Tomita M, Okudaira T, Nakazato T, Toda T, Uchihara JN, Taira N, Ohshiro K, Yasumoto T, Ohta T, Mori N. Anti-adult T-cell leukemia effects of brown algae fucoxanthin and its deacetylated product, fucoxanthinol. Int J Cancer. 2008 Dec 1;123(11):2702-12.
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Vitamin-less Vegetables:


The New Nutrient Deficiency

Who Cares about Vegetables?

The National Academy of Sciences (NAS), the FDA and the USDA consider vegetables one of the primary dietary sources of vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients (non-vitamin, non-mineral nutrients derived from plants). Why? Because optimal levels of vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients are necessary to prevent cancer, heart disease, neurological disease, and diabetes to name only a few. In other words, those in science and medicine agree that humans need the nutrients contained in vegetables and some fruits for proper nutrition and good health. In fact, nutrient deficiencies are considered by many physicians and scientists to be one of the primary causes of disease today. Because of this, the current USDA recommendation is to eat 3-5 servings of vegetables and 2-4 servings of fruit per day.

The Sad News about Vegetables and Vitamins

YOU DO NOT EAT enough vegetables and high-nutrient fruits. How do I know this even if I don’t know you? Consider these facts:

I.) Most Americans do not achieve even the minimum 5 per day servings of produce. The current recommendations for veggie/fruit intake are 5-9 per day. A pickle, lettuce leaf, onion ring and ketchup on your burger DO NOT count as 4 servings of vegetables! Commercial fruit juice counts toward little but sugar intake because enzymes, fiber and vitamins are destroyed during processing. A side of french fries or onion rings with your burger don’t constitute a serving of nutrient-dense vegetable due to their high trans fat content and the fact that nutrients are destroyed during high-heat cooking. Further, for reason stated in #2 (below), even if you DO get 5-9 legitimate servings of vegetables per day, this current recommendation is almost surely NOT enough.

II.) Commercially grown vegetables and fruits today do not contain as many nutrients as before. According to Institute of Nutrition, recent studies of more than a dozen fruits and vegetables demonstrate a decrease in the nutrient value of most, and in some cases the drop is drastic. For instance, the Vitamin A content in apples has dropped from 90 mg to 53mg. Vitamin C in sweet peppers has decreased from 128mg to 89mg. This is why many at the NAS think the 5-9 servings recommendation should be doubled. (Math help: this updated recommendation would equal 10-18 servings per day of vegetables and fruits).

III.) Storing and/or cooking destroy many nutrients, rendering them “less” than a serving of the recommended daily dose.

Vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients (“plant nutrients” including bioflavonoids, carotenoids, proanthocyanidins, etc.) are crucial to good health, yet even a “good” Standard American Diet (SAD) does not contain enough of these nutrients to meet the proven standards that prevent disease. Further, surveys show that most Americans do not obtain the lower recommendation of 5 servings per day, let alone the upper recommendation of 9 servings per day. Nutritional Supplementation appears both valuable and necessary in achieving the proven health-protective doses of nutrients.

Dr. Myatt’s Comment:

While the USDA, FDA and commercial agri-business assure us that vegetables and fruits are as healthy as ever, the USDA’s own records show a plummeting level of nutrients since the 1960’s. All the while, medical science keeps stacking up new studies that demonstrate the disease-preventing effects of optimal doses of vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients. Still, you’ll read propaganda that assures you that you don’t need supplements because you can obtain everything you need from “a good diet.” (And you probably could get everything you need from diet IF you ate 5-9 servings of produce that was home-grown and eaten fresh, meat that was grass-fed without antibiotics and hormones, and dairy from same). But that’s not the reality of the American diet. Perhaps that is why, in spite spending more money on healthcare than any country in the world, the US ranks only 24th in life expectancy.

All unsupported claims to the contrary, nutritional supplementation with vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients appears to be the safest, surest and least expensive way to stay healthy and reverse disease.

Here is what I personally take and recommend to others to help achieve optimal daily nutrition:

Maxi Multi multi vitamin, mineral and trace mineral supplement with optimal does of nutrients (the levels shown in studies to prevent disease), not minimal doses.
AND
Maxi Greens high potency multiple green food supplement in capsules
AND/OR
Greens First , a powdered, great-tasting green food supplement that has the equivalent of 10 servings of veggies in one refreshing drink. (The taste is so good you can even get kids to take it)!

And here’s a handy tip from Wellness Club member JoAnne, who dries out her empty water bottles, adds a serving of GreensFirst and takes the bottles to work. For a quick pick-me-up, she just adds water and shakes!

References

5-A-Day Guide^

USDA^

Veggies W/out Vitamins^

Drop in minerals concerns organic community^

Organic consumer association^

New Study Shows Decreasing Nutrient Value of Certain Fruits and Vegetables – An Increasing Need for Multivitamin and Mineral Complex Supplements^

Population Life Expectancy^