Tocotrienols


The “Other” Vitamin E

Tocotrienols“Vitamin E” is actually a mixture of tocotrienols and tocopherols, two forms of the same vitamin. Like tocopherols (the “classic” vitamin E), tocotrienols are also potent antioxidants that protect against lipid peroxidation (the damaging of fats by free radicals).

Research has shown that although tocotrienols and tocopherols possess similar activity, they work slightly differently in the body. The very newest research shows that tocotrienols may be even more valuable to good health than the classic form of vitamin E, tocopherols.

Actions of tocotrienols:

  • cholesterol-lowering properties not seen with regular vitamin E (tocopherols).
  • Tocotrienols reduce AGEs (advanced glycosylated end-products),
  • encourage healthy blood pressure levels and arterial health
  • support normal blood sugar balance
  • prevent fat oxidation

Both gamma- and delta-tocotrienols are powerful antioxidants working at the cells’ surface. Evidence indicates that tocotrienols are absorbed better than tocopherols.

The typical recommendation is 140 to 360 mg per day. Most studies have used 200 mg daily.

Contains: Tocotrienols 100 mg ( 90% Delta- Tocotrienols and 10% Gamma- Tocotrienols)

Other ingredients: Rice bran oil, gelatin, glycerin, water.

Suggested Dose: 1 or 2 softgels, one or two times daily or as directed by a healthcare practitioner.

References:

1. Kamal-Eldin A, Appelqvist LA. The chemistry and antioxidant properties of tocopherols and tocotrienols. Lipids 1996;31:671–701 [review].
2. Kamat JP, Devasagayam TPA. Tocotrienols from palm oil as potent inhibitors of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation in rat brain mitochondria. Neurosci Lett 1995;195:179–82.
3. Sen CK, Khanna S, Roy S. Tocotrienols: Vitamin E beyond tocopherols. Life Sci. 2006;78:2088-98.
4.) Schaffer S, Muller WE, and Eckert GP. Tocotrienols: constitutional effects in aging and disease. J Nutr. 2005;135:151-4.
5.) Theriault A, Chao JT, Wang Q, et al. Tocotrienol: a review of its therapeutic potential. Clin Biochem 1999;32:309–19 [review].

Vitamin E


The Premier Fat-Soluble Antioxidant

Vitamin E is the primary fat-soluble antioxidant vitamin in the body. (Vitamin C is the primary water-soluble antioxidant). Vitamin E plays a major role in  cellular respiration. Deficiencies of Vitamin E are associated with:

  • heart disease
  • cancer
  • strokes
  • arthritis
  • allergies
  • infections
  • inflammation
  • diabetes
  • neurological damage
  • muscle weakness
  • fibrocystic breast disease
  • eczema
  • macular degeneration
  • poor wound healing

Dietary sources of Vitamin E include: wheat germ oil, nuts, whole grains, egg yolk.

NOTE: Doses over 800 IU per day of vitamin E may elevate triglycerides.

Maxi Multi provides 400 IU per day of Vitamin E

Those requiring additional Vitamin E supplementation should consider Tocotrienols

Zinc


The Enzyme Activator

Zinc is a mineral that functions as a co-factor in numerous metabolic processes. In fact, zinc is a co-factor in over 200 enzymes in the body.

Zinc deficiency is associated with:

  • prostate enlargement
  • immune deficiency
  • atherosclerosis
  • malabsorption syndromes
  • slow wound healing
  • loss of taste or smell
  • impaired glucose tolerance
  • skin disorders of every type
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)
  • inflammatory bowel disease (IBS)
  • abnormal menstruation

The adult daily dose range is from 15-50 mg.

Food sources include wheat germ, wheat bran, pumpkin seed, avocado, sea food.

Caution: Large doses (more than 50mg/day) can cause a copper deficiency & other mineral imbalances. Copper should be supplemented when using zinc in high doses.

Optimal daily amounts of Zinc are easily obtained from Dr. Myatt’s Maxi Multi – a comprehensive multiple vitamin and mineral nutrient formula. Click here for full information.

 

Vitamin C

Master Immune Stimulant and Antioxidant

Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin that plays a major role in numerous biological functions including:

  • collagen synthesis (production of tendon, ligament, cartilage and skin)
  • immune function – increases white blood cell activity, interferon production and thymic hormone secretion.
  • cardiovascular health
  • cancer prevention

Levels of vitamin C are quickly depleted during infection. Our vitamin C is specially buffered to reduce acidity.

Vitamin C CapsulesVitamin C Buffered Capsules

One full gram of buffered vitamin C in every capsule.

An excellent source of antioxidant support, Buffered Vitamin C uses pure crystalline ascorbic acid to supply 1 gram of vitamin C in each capsule. This well-tolerated vitamin C formula supports a healthy immune system response and helps maintain healthy skin, collagen, and connective tissues.

Each (one) Capsule contains:
Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) – 1000 mg
Calcium (as calcium carbonate) – 20 mg
Magnesium (as magnesium carbonate) – 12 mg

Suggested dose: 1 capsule, 1-3 times per day, OR 1 capsule every 1-2 hours during acute illness, OR 1 capsule 3-4 times a day for accelerated vitamin C therapy.

Vitamin C Buffered Capsules – Product # 266 (60 Capsules) $15.95

Buffered Vitamin C Does Not Contain

  • artificial coloring
  • artificial flavoring
  • corn
  • dairy products
  • gluten
  • ingredients of animal origin
  • preservatives
  • salt
  • soy
  • sugar
  • wheat
  • yeast

Other Ingredients: vegetable capsule (modified cellulose), and ascorbyl palmitate.


Vitamin C Buffered Crystals

Description – High potency buffered vitamin Cpreparation in an effervescent, mineral-rich blend. Mixes easily in water or other beverages.

Each 1/4 teaspoon contains:
Vitamin C – 1066 mg
Calcium (calcium ascorbate) – 117 mg

Suggested dose: 1/4 teaspoon, 1-3 times per day, OR 1/4 teaspoon every 1-2 hours during acute illness, OR 1/4 teaspoon 3-4 times a day for accelerated vitamin C therapy.

Vitamin C Buffered Crystals – Product # 146 (8.8 ounces) $18.95

SMOKING…….JUST THE FACTS

  • Smoking weakens the immune system by inhibiting cellular immunity.
  • Tobacco smoke contains carbon monoxide, a substance that is toxic to the brain.
  • Tobacco smoking is associated with a higher incidence of gingivitis and tooth loss.
  • Tobacco smoke contains cadmium, a heavy metal that can cause high blood pressure, kidney stones, and other toxic symptoms.
  • Tobacco smoke induces the formation of free radicals – highly reactive molecules that can bind to normal, healthy cells and destroy them.
  • Smokers have a higher incidence of peptic ulcer disease, a decreased response to anti-ulcer medications, and a higher mortality from peptic ulcer.
  • Female smokers are at higher risk of developing osteoporosis.
  • Female smokers are at higher risk for premature menopause.
  • Smoking accelerates skin aging and wrinkle formation.
  • Smoking causes a decrease in penile blood flow and can cause impotence in males.
  • Smokers have a three to five-fold increase in coronary artery disease compared to non-smokers.
  • Smoking is associated with the development of urinary tract cancer, bowel cancer, pancreatic cancer, cervical and uterine cancer – and yes, lung cancer.
  • Smoking is a potent risk factor for atherosclerosis.
  • 40% of heavy smokers die before they reach retirement age.
  • Nicotine causes adrenaline release, which can cause anxiety, heart palpitations, diarrhea, and high blood pressure.
  • Hydrogen cyanide, a chemical in tobacco smoke, causes inflammation of the bronchi which leads to bronchitis. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema often eventually result.
  • The adrenal stimulation caused by nicotine can aggravate hypoglycemia. Eventually, adrenal exhaustion results.
  • The American Lung Association reports that 350,000 Americans die each year from cigarette smoking. This is more than the combined deaths from illegal drugs, traffic accidents, suicide, homicide, and alcohol.

Don’t Kid Yourself.
Smoking tobacco is incompatible with a healthy lifestyle.

 

Sinus Infection (Sinusitis)


Natural Support For This Troublesome Condition

Sinusitis is an infection of the sinus passages, usually the frontal (head/eyes) or nasal sinuses. Symptoms may include a thick nasal discharge, pain or tenderness over the involved sinuses, headache and sometimes fever with chills. Such infection can be a one-time occurrence but is more commonly chronic and recurrent.

Recent studies have shown that antibiotic therapy is largely useless for sinusitis. Only in cases of severe pain or when symptoms have been present for more than two weeks are antibiotics sometimes indicated. Another study has shown that over 90% of people with sinusitis have some degree of yeast or fungus growing in their sinus cavities.

Anything that causes swelling of the mucous membrane (internal “skin” that lines the sinus cavities) can block normal drainage of the sinuses and lead to infection. Common causes of chronic & recurrent sinusitis include food allergy, respiratory allergy, low immune function and dental infection. (Dental infection is a frequently-overlooked cause of chronic sinusitis).

Treatment involves both acute management AND correction of underlying, predisposing factors.

Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations

  • For acute sinusitis: Follow recommendations for diet listed under Colds and Flu. Avoid the foods listed below under “chronic sinusitis” during an acute attack.
  • For chronic sinusitis: Assess for food allergies. Milk, wheat, corn, citrus and peanut butter are common food allergens associated with sinusitis. It may be wise to avoid these foods until definitive allergy-testing is completed.
  • Have a dental check-up if you have not had one in the past six months.

Primary Support

  • Maxi Multi: 3 caps, 3 times per day with meals. Optimal (not minimal) doses of antioxidant nutrients (vitamin A, beta carotene, C, E, zinc, selenium) and bioflavonoids are especially important in treating sinusitis.
  • Max EPA (Omega-3 rich fish oil): 1-2 caps, 3 times per day with meals (target dose: 3-6 caps per day). Fish oil is anti-inflammatory.
  • Immune support: 2 caps, 1-2 times per day for general immune enhancement.

Additional Support

During acute episodes:

  • Bromelain: 2 caps, 4 times per day between meals. With improvement, decrease to 1 cap, 3-4 times per day. Bromelain thins mucous so it can exit the sinus passages. It will also aid with mucous digestion once this gunk makes it’s way to the stomach.
  • Use all recommendations for acute infection.
  • Use hot packs over the sinuses during acute attacks for pain relief and decongestion.
  • Inspirol inhalant – the most potent inhalant you’ve ever used! Breathe this at least 4 times per day, but up to hourly or more if needed, during acute infection.

Tests

  • Review the symptoms of Candidiasis. If you have more than 4 of the listed symptoms, consider having a Candida test performed.

Dr. Myatt’s Comment

Correction of the underlying factors involved in chronic or recurrent sinusitis, such as food allergy and Candidiasis, will nearly always correct the problem. If you have had chronic sinusitis for many years, be patient. Complete correction may take a year or more. Patients who have overcome chronic sinusitis problems tell me it’s well worth the effort.

 

Vitamins and Mineral Supplements

Your Concise Guide To Nutritional Supplements

Definitions

Vitamins are organic compounds that are necessary for human life and health. Vitamins cannot be manufactured in the body (vitamin B12 is an exception) and so must be obtained from diet.

Minerals are inorganic ions (metals) that are also necessary for life and health. Minerals are not manufactured in the body and so must be obtained from diet.

Trace minerals are minerals necessary to the body in extremely small, or “trace,” amounts.

Accessory nutrients are substances that are not absolutely necessary for life and health (as vitamins and minerals are), but that participate with vitamins and minerals in numerous biochemical reactions.

Vitamins: What You Should be Taking, and Why

Taking vitamins is a wise health and prevention measure. Deficiencies of vitamins and minerals cause many diseases. Adding vitamins and minerals in supplemental form is an inexpensive “insurance policy” against some of the worst diseases of modern times.

A deficiency of vitamins and minerals are associated with these diseases:

A deficiency of antioxidant vitamins and minerals (especially beta carotene, vitamins C & E, and selenium) is associated with higher incidence of cancers of the colon, breast, prostate, mouth, lungs and skin. Some researchers believe that antioxidant vitamin and mineral deficiencies may be related to higher incidence of all cancers.

A mineral deficiency, especially magnesium and potassium but also calcium, is associated with high blood pressure.

Deficiencies of vitamins E, C, B6, B12, folic acid (a B vitamin), and bioflavonoids are associated with cardiovascular disease. The connection between vitamin E and heart health is so well established that conventional medical cardiologists are instructed to recommend vitamin E to their patients.

Healthy bones, and the prevention of osteoporosis, depend on sufficient levels of minerals, including calcium, magnesium, boron, zinc, copper, B vitamins, and vitamin D.

In males, benign prostatic hypertrophy is associated with decreased levels of zinc. Zinc deficiency also correlates to decreased immune function. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and diabetes (high blood sugar) occur more frequently in people who are chromium deficient. After diabetes is present, low levels of vitamins A, C, E, plus zinc, selenium, choline, bioflavonoids and B complex vitamins are associated with more complications from the disease.

This list could go on for pages, but you get the idea. A deficiencyof key vitamins and mineralsare correlated with disease. Such vitamin deficiencies are also common in the modern American diet. Depleted soils result in lowered vitamin and mineral content in produce AND Americans eat less fresh produce than ever before. Much of our food is highly processed, removing not only vitamins and minerals but also fiber and enzymes.

The best health insurance may not be an expensive medical policy, but the addition of sufficient vitamins to fill in the gaps in our day-to-day nutritional status.

Some people take a wide array of individual and/or exotic supplements, but these should NOT replace a basic, healthful level of vitamin supplementation. I have listed the best and most complete formulas for basic multiple vitamin and mineral supplementation. I recommend this for all adults over age 18. If you have a special medical condition, consult an holistic physician for further recommendations. (See Telephone Consultations with Dr. Myatt)

Basic Vitamins and Minerals Supplement Program (For health maintenance in healthy individuals OR as the basis of a health program in those with known health problems). 1) Multi Vitamin / Mineral formula without iron (unless your doctor has specifically told you to take iron). There is no such thing as a good multiple vitamin supplement in a single pill. Optimal daily dosage levels of essential vitamins and minerals do not fit into one tablet or capsule. Expect to be taking 6 to 9 capsules or tablets to fulfill Optimal Daily Doses of key vitamins.

Modern Dietetics In A Nutshell

Nutritional Deficiencies

It has long been recognized that the human body will not function efficiently without vitamins and minerals. In fact, serious diseases and death result when nutrient levels become too low. Because vitamins and minerals are necessary for every chemical reaction in the body, an excess or deficiency can greatly alter physical function.

“RDA’s” (nutrient levels recommended by the U.S. Department of Agriculture) are sufficient to prevent serious deficiency-caused illnesses. (Rickets due to vitamin D deficiency, for example). They are not sufficient for optimal health and well-being.

Many scientists today agree that higher levels of certain nutrients are necessary to protect us from disease. It is also an accepted fact that even small deficiencies of nutrients can result in a decline in physical health, often before modern medicine can name a “disease.” Such deficiencies are called “subclinical,” (meaning “before they are a diagnosable illness”) and are the precursors to more serious illness.

The Standard American Diet (S.A.D.) is typically excessive in calories while being deficient in vitamins, minerals, and accessory nutrients. This is probably due to several factors: easy availability of refined-flour, high sugar foods; extensive processing of foods (which removes nutrients and fiber); and plant foods grown in mineral-deficient soils.

In addition, increased environmental exposure to toxic substances increases the body’s need for certain nutrients, especially antioxidants. (See Antioxidants.)

To ensure that you are obtaining optimal dietary nutrient levels, examine your current diet in view of the vitamin/mineral/accessory nutrient guide below. Keep a three-day diet diary to assist in calculating your baseline level of nutrient intake. Then, make dietary changes and take nutritional supplements as needed to ensure daily optimal nutrient intake.

Which Vitamin Formula is Right For You?

If you are a: Multiple Formula Antioxidants Comments Man Maxi Multi OR Once Daily MyPacks Included in Maxi Multi and MyPacks A separate antioxidant is usually needed with other multiples, not with these. Woman of Childbearing Age Nutrizyme with iron (see comment) OR Once Daily MyPacks Included in Maxi Multi and MyPacks Take a multiple WITH iron if you have heavy menstrual flow. Post-Menopausal Woman Maxi Multi OR Once Daily MyPacks Included in Maxi Multi and MyPacks Take additional Cal-Mag Amino to total 1200-1500 mg calcium per day if you are at risk for Osteoporosis. Senior Maxi Multi OR Nutrizyme with iron (see comments) Included in Maxi Multi and MyPacks Take a formula with iron only if directed to do so by your doctor. Children Children’s Multi-Vitamin and Minerals Children’s Antioxidants Specially formulated for children ages 4-12.

Vitamins

vitamin major functions major deficiency associations optimal adult dose range best food sources cautions/
notes
vitamin A bone formation
skin health vision night blindness, dry eyes,
skin diseases 5,000-10,000 IU fish liver oils Do not take more than 50,000 IU per day for 3 months without medical supervision.

beta-carotene

converted to vitamin A in the body; antioxidant ulcerative colitis, skin diseases, smoking 10,000-50,000 IU green and yellow vegetables; carrots Use only natural beta-carotene; high doses may cause yellow skin (harmless).

vitamin D

increases calcium absorption;
decreases overall mortality rate osteoporosis, rheumatic pains, dental disease,
cancer,
impaired immunity 800-5,000 IU or as
directed by a physician. SUNSHINE! fish liver oil egg yolk The current daily dose of 400IU may be be set too low for optimal health.

vitamin E (tocopherol)

cellular respiration; antioxidant heart disease neurological aging 200-800 IU wheat germ oil, nuts, whole grains, egg yolk Doses over
800 IU day may elevate triglycerides.

vitamin K

blood clotting factor; bone formation osteoporosis 20-100 mcg broccoli, spinach, green tea, green cabbage, tomato Do not supplement if you are on anti-epileptic medication.

vitamin C

collagen synthesis, anti-viral, wound healing, antioxidant joint pain/arthritis, atherosclerosis, bleeding gums, decreased immunity 300-3,000 mg broccoli, red pepper, citrus fruits, cabbage At high doses, vitamin C will loosen the bowels.

vitamin B1 (thiamine)

energy processes fatigue, mental confusion, neuropathy 5-100 mg eggs, berries, nuts, legumes, liver, yeast Nontoxic.

vitamin B2 (riboflavin)

energy processes, wound healing, activates other B vitamins infection, cataracts, blurred vision, eye surgery 5-100 mg green leafy vegetables, eggs, organ meats Nontoxic. Higher doses will make urine a harmless, bright yellow.

vitamin B3 (niacin)

energy processes depression, tension headaches, memory loss 20-100 mg milk, eggs, fish, whole meal wheat flour Doses greater than 50mg may cause a skin flush. Take high doses only with doctors supervision.

vitamin B5(pantothenic acid)

energy processes; adrenal gland function allergies, morning stiffness; fatigue; muscle cramps 10-1,000 mg eggs, yeast, liver No known toxicity.

vitamin B6(pyridoxine)

energy processes; antibody formation insomnia, irritability, atherosclerosis 5-200 mg wheat germ, yeast, whole grains Oral contraceptive use increases need for this vitamin.

Folic acid

red blood cell formation, RNA/DNA synthesis fatigue, depression, atherosclerosis 200-800 mcg beans, green leafy veggies, yeast Do not take with Phenobarbital or dilantin.

vitamin B12

red blood cell formation; energy processes atherosclerosis, memory loss, GI symptoms 10-1,200 mcg fermented soy products; root veggies Nontoxic.

Biotin

energy processes; blood sugar regulation muscle pain, depression 300-600 mcg egg yolks, whole wheat No known toxicity.

Minerals

Mineral: functions deficiency associations adult dose range food sources cautions

*Calcium

bone & tooth formation; heart & muscle function osteoporosis, bone spurs, muscle cramps, rheumatism 200-1500 mg barley, kale, unrefined grains; milk, green veggies Prolonged excess may cause a mineral imbalance.

*Magnesium

energy processes, nerve function, enzyme activation stress, senility, osteoporosis, insomnia 150-600 mg avocados, almonds, whole grains, grapefruit Doses over 400 mg can cause diarrhea in some people.

Potassium

pH balance, nerve function stress, atherosclerosis, high blood pressure 1800-5625* mg * a normal diet should contain sufficient potassium potato peel, bananas, beans, almonds, whole grains Do not take high supplemental doses (food Sources are O.K.) when taking heart medicine without physician guidance.

Sodium

pH balance, nerve function Excess is more common and is assoc with high blood pressure limit daily intake to 1,500 mg okra, celery, black mission figs Very few people (athletes, diarrhea /vomiting) need to supplement.

Phosphorus

energy production, bones/teeth, B Vit. activation tooth/gum disorders, impotence, equilibrium 300-600 mg barley, beans, fish, lentils, dark green veggies Prolonged, large doses can cause calcium deficiency or mineral imbalance.

Iron

Red Blood cell production dizziness, depression, anemia 10-30 mg blackberries, cherries, spinach Do NOT take iron unless told to do so by your doctor. Iron excess is associated with health problems.

*Zinc

co-factor in numerous metabolic processes prostate enlargement, immune deficiency; atherosclerosis 15-50 mg wheat germ, wheat bran, pumpkin seed, avocado, sea food Large doses (50mg, day) can cause a copper deficiency & other mineral imbalances.

*Copper

Red blood cell production; skeletal, heart & muscle function osteoporosis, digestive function, nerve disorders 2-3 mg green leafy veggies, almonds, beans, sea food Higher doses can be toxic.

*Manganese

glandular function, bone & ligament health  diabetes, asthma, digestive disturbance 2-10 mg nuts, seeds, avocados, grapefruit, apricots High doses may create other mineral imbalances.

*Chromium

glucose metabolism; blood sugar regulation; heart function atherosclerosis, diabetes, hypoglycemia, high cholesterol, overweight 200-500 mcg whole grain cereals, molasses, meat, yeast Nontoxic at therapeutic levels.

*Selenium

antioxidant, synergistic with vitamin E cancer prevention; aging 100-200 mcg bran, whole grains, tuna, broccoli, onion Prolonged excess may be toxic. * indicates minerals most often deficient in the diet. Other minerals not marked with a * usually do not need to be supplemented. Other minerals and trace minerals include: molybdenum, flourine, chlorine, cobalt, silicon, boron, sulphur, vanadium

ACCESSORY NUTRIENTS

Bioflavonoids – compounds found in most plants in association with vitamin C. Bioflavonoids are potent antioxidants. Higher dietary levels are useful in heart disease and atherosclerosis, bleeding gums, weak immune system, inflammation, varicose veins, hayfever.

CoQ10 – (ubiquinone) A naturally-occurring compound in the human body that is a vital co-factor in energy production. Conditions benefited by increased CoQ10 levels include: cardiovascular disease, angina, congestive heart failure, mitral valve prolapse, immune deficiency, obesity, diabetes, periodontal disease, cancer, muscular dystrophy. Also use in longevity and rejuvenation programs.

Fiber – Plant cell walls present in whole grains, legumes, fruits and vegetables. This part of the plant is usually lost in processing. Fiber deficiency is associated with numerous illnesses: obesity, atherosclerosis, diabetes, gallstones, varicose veins, constipation, diverticulosis, irritable bowel, colon cancer, high blood pressure and high cholesterol.

FOS (fructooligosaccharides) Naturally- occurring sugar-like substances that act as food to friendly GI bacteria. In human body cells, this substance is not utilized as energy (or as a true sugar), but to probiotic gut bacteria, FOS is a banquet. The addition of FOS to probiotic formulas (as in Enterogenic concentrate, product # 218), helps good bacteria re-colonize the GI tract faster and more plentifully.

Friendly bacteria – (probiotics) The naturally-occurring bacteria of the colon help protect us from many conditions, including candidiasis, allergies, constipation, B12 vitamin deficiency. These good bacteria are damaged or destroyed by dietary imbalances, antibiotic and other drug use. Replacement of good bacteria results in improved colon function.

Glucosamine sulfate – A naturally occurring substance that has been found to be highly effective in treating osteoarthritis. It acts both to reduce pain and to stimulate joint repair.

5-Hydroxy-Tryptophan-(5-HTP)
5-HTP is the intermediate metabolite of the amino acid L-tryptophan. This amino acid intermediate participates in the body’s production of serotonin. It also stimulates increased endorphin, melatonin, norepinephrine and dopamine production. These brain chemicals (neuro-transmitters) help increase energy, improve mood and sleep, and decrease appetite. Useful for insomnia, mood disorder (anxiety/depression) and weight loss programs.

L-Carnitine – an amino acid that is crucial to normal energy production and fat metabolism. Carnitine has been shown to benefit atherosclerotic heart disease and high cholesterol and triglycerides. Improves fat metabolism throughout the body.

L-Glutathione – A tri peptide (3 amino acids) that acts as a potent antioxidant in the body. Supplementation is useful in allergies, cancer prevention, liver detoxification, cataracts, heavy metal toxicity, longevity and rejuvenation.

Omega-3 Oils are derived from fatty fish and flax seeds. These fatty acids are anti-inflammatory and have a positive effect on cardiovascular disease, including high cholesterol and high blood pressure, allergic and inflammatory conditions (including psoriasis and eczema), autoimmune diseases, cancer, neurological disease, menopause, general health enhancement.

Omega-6 Oils found in evening primrose, black currant, borage and a number of vegetable oils. Although supplementation is popular, these oils increase arachadonic acid levels (an inflammatory substance). Only diabetics need to supplement very small doses of this oil. (less than 500mg/day).

Vitamin-less Vegetables:


The New Nutrient Deficiency

Who Cares about Vegetables?

The National Academy of Sciences (NAS), the FDA and the USDA consider vegetables one of the primary dietary sources of vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients (non-vitamin, non-mineral nutrients derived from plants). Why? Because optimal levels of vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients are necessary to prevent cancer, heart disease, neurological disease, and diabetes to name only a few. In other words, those in science and medicine agree that humans need the nutrients contained in vegetables and some fruits for proper nutrition and good health. In fact, nutrient deficiencies are considered by many physicians and scientists to be one of the primary causes of disease today. Because of this, the current USDA recommendation is to eat 3-5 servings of vegetables and 2-4 servings of fruit per day.

The Sad News about Vegetables and Vitamins

YOU DO NOT EAT enough vegetables and high-nutrient fruits. How do I know this even if I don’t know you? Consider these facts:

I.) Most Americans do not achieve even the minimum 5 per day servings of produce. The current recommendations for veggie/fruit intake are 5-9 per day. A pickle, lettuce leaf, onion ring and ketchup on your burger DO NOT count as 4 servings of vegetables! Commercial fruit juice counts toward little but sugar intake because enzymes, fiber and vitamins are destroyed during processing. A side of french fries or onion rings with your burger don’t constitute a serving of nutrient-dense vegetable due to their high trans fat content and the fact that nutrients are destroyed during high-heat cooking. Further, for reason stated in #2 (below), even if you DO get 5-9 legitimate servings of vegetables per day, this current recommendation is almost surely NOT enough.

II.) Commercially grown vegetables and fruits today do not contain as many nutrients as before. According to Institute of Nutrition, recent studies of more than a dozen fruits and vegetables demonstrate a decrease in the nutrient value of most, and in some cases the drop is drastic. For instance, the Vitamin A content in apples has dropped from 90 mg to 53mg. Vitamin C in sweet peppers has decreased from 128mg to 89mg. This is why many at the NAS think the 5-9 servings recommendation should be doubled. (Math help: this updated recommendation would equal 10-18 servings per day of vegetables and fruits).

III.) Storing and/or cooking destroy many nutrients, rendering them “less” than a serving of the recommended daily dose.

Vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients (“plant nutrients” including bioflavonoids, carotenoids, proanthocyanidins, etc.) are crucial to good health, yet even a “good” Standard American Diet (SAD) does not contain enough of these nutrients to meet the proven standards that prevent disease. Further, surveys show that most Americans do not obtain the lower recommendation of 5 servings per day, let alone the upper recommendation of 9 servings per day. Nutritional Supplementation appears both valuable and necessary in achieving the proven health-protective doses of nutrients.

Dr. Myatt’s Comment:

While the USDA, FDA and commercial agri-business assure us that vegetables and fruits are as healthy as ever, the USDA’s own records show a plummeting level of nutrients since the 1960’s. All the while, medical science keeps stacking up new studies that demonstrate the disease-preventing effects of optimal doses of vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients. Still, you’ll read propaganda that assures you that you don’t need supplements because you can obtain everything you need from “a good diet.” (And you probably could get everything you need from diet IF you ate 5-9 servings of produce that was home-grown and eaten fresh, meat that was grass-fed without antibiotics and hormones, and dairy from same). But that’s not the reality of the American diet. Perhaps that is why, in spite spending more money on healthcare than any country in the world, the US ranks only 24th in life expectancy.

All unsupported claims to the contrary, nutritional supplementation with vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients appears to be the safest, surest and least expensive way to stay healthy and reverse disease.

Here is what I personally take and recommend to others to help achieve optimal daily nutrition:

Maxi Multi multi vitamin, mineral and trace mineral supplement with optimal does of nutrients (the levels shown in studies to prevent disease), not minimal doses.
AND
Maxi Greens high potency multiple green food supplement in capsules
AND/OR
Greens First , a powdered, great-tasting green food supplement that has the equivalent of 10 servings of veggies in one refreshing drink. (The taste is so good you can even get kids to take it)!

And here’s a handy tip from Wellness Club member JoAnne, who dries out her empty water bottles, adds a serving of GreensFirst and takes the bottles to work. For a quick pick-me-up, she just adds water and shakes!

References

5-A-Day Guide^

USDA^

Veggies W/out Vitamins^

Drop in minerals concerns organic community^

Organic consumer association^

New Study Shows Decreasing Nutrient Value of Certain Fruits and Vegetables – An Increasing Need for Multivitamin and Mineral Complex Supplements^

Population Life Expectancy^

 

Pau ‘d’ Arco


(Tabebuia spp.) [a.k.a. Lapacho]

Actions: Anti-tumor; anti-Candidal; antibiotic; immune stimulant; anti-inflammatory; tonic.

Uses: Candidiasis; fungus; immune stimulation; infections; cancer.

What’s Burning You?

The REAL Cause of Heartburn, Indigestion and GERD and “Sour Stomach”

Older people have considerably more digestive problems than younger folks, and this has typically but incorrectly been blamed on over-production of stomach acid. Not only have medical studies debunked excess stomach acid as the cause of indigestion, but common sense debunks the myth as well.

Why does this matter? Because the chronic use of antacids and acid-blocking drugs for indigestion has some dangerous and even deadly side-effects

The “Acid Over-Production” Myth Debunked

Do you really think that some bodily function starts working better with age? Hahahaha!

With age, nothing works as well as it did in earlier years. I hope I’m not popping anyone’s bubble here.

Come on – we don’t move as fast at age 57 as we did at 27. Vision and hearing are typically less acute in our 70s than they were in our 30s. Skin is less elastic at 69 than at 29. Production of hormones and body fluids decreases with age. Why would we think that our stomachs do the opposite of all other organs and become more active with age instead of less active? Only a drug salesman or a pill-pushing doctor would try to convince us of such foolishness.

The stomach’s primary job is to digest protein and emulsify fats, and it does this by making an extremely powerful acid called hydrochloric acid (HCL) and a protein-digesting enzyme called pepsin. The hydrochloric acid made by a healthy stomach is one million times stronger than the mild acidity of urine or saliva. A leather-like strip of jerky can be quickly turned into “beef soup” by the action of hydrochloric acid and pepsin in the stomach. That’s how normal digestion is supposed to work.

But just like the rest of an aging body, the stomach’s hydrochloric acid and pepsin production decreases over time. As a result, we do not digest food as well. The term “indigestion” implies lack of digestion, not over-digestion. This is why we can’t eat a whole pepperoni pizza washed down with a bottle of soda like we did when we were teenagers. Our aging stomachs don’t have the same digestive vigor – strong hydrochloric acid and pepsin – to digest food like youthful stomachs do.

Medical Science Verifies Low Acid Production

OK, that’s the common sense of it. Now here’s the science. Many older studies conducted on several thousand people in the 1930?s and 1940?s showed that half of all people by age 60 were functioning at only 50% gastric acid output. Numerous contemporary studies verify that that stomach acid production often declines with age.

The Bottom Line: when someone over age 40 has chronic or chronic / intermittent indigestion, that indigestion is almost certainly due to a weaker stomach with less acid and pepsin output, not a stronger stomach making more digestive juices.

“But My Symptoms Feel Like Too Much Acid…”

Strong stomach acid and pepsin quickly “emulsify” fats and proteins, making them ready for the next step of digestion, passage into the small intestine. When these digestive factors are weak, food remains in the stomach for longer and it begins to ferment. Gas pressure from the fermentation can cause bloating and discomfort and can can also cause the esophageal sphincter to open, allowing stomach contents to “backwash” into the esophagus.

Even though weak stomach acid is the central cause of this, even this weak stomach acid, which has no place in the esophagus, will “burn.” This burning sensation confuses many people, including doctors, who then “ASSuME” that excess acid is to blame. Too little acid, resulting in slowed digestion, and gas which creates back-pressure into the esophagus is the real cause of almost all “heartburn” and GERD.

Why People Take Acid-Blockers

Why in the world would anyone take antacids or acid blockers to correct a deficiency of stomach acid? In two words: symptom relief.

But if heartburn or gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD) are caused by too little stomach acid, why does blocking more of the acid relieve the discomfort? And why isn’t that a good thing to do?

Remember, even weak stomach acid does not belong in the esophagus. When ALL acid production is blocked, the “backwash” of stomach contents into the esophagus will not burn. However, repeatedly using this “band-aid” method has some serious long-term consequences.

The Dangers of Antacids and Acid-Blocking Drugs

Our bodies need 60 or so essential nutrients. “Essential” means that the body MUST have this nutrient or death will eventually ensue, and the nutrient must be obtained from diet because the body cannot manufacture it. Many of these essential nutrients require stomach acid for their assimilation. When stomach acid production declines, nutrient deficiencies begin.

Calcium, for example, requires vigorous stomach acid in order to be assimilated. Interestingly, the rate of hip replacement surgery is much higher in people who routinely use antacids and acid-blocking drugs. We know that people who have “acid stomach” were already having trouble assimilating calcium from food and nutritional supplements due to lack of normal stomach acid production. When these symptoms are “band-aided” with drugs which decrease stomach acid even more, calcium assimilation can come to a near-halt. The result? Weak bones, hip fractures and joint complaints resulting in major surgery.

Jonathan Wright, M.D., well-known and respected holistic physician, states that:

“Although research in this area is entirely inadequate, its been my clinical observation that calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, copper, chromium, selenium, manganese, vanadium, molybdenum, cobalt, and many other micro-trace elements are not nearly as well-absorbed in those with poor stomach acid as they are in those whose acid levels are normal. When we test plasma amino acid levels for those with poor stomach function, we frequently find lower than usual levels of one or more of the eight essential amino acids: isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan, and valine. Often there are functional insufficiencies of folic acid and/or vitamin B12.”

Remember, these are essential nutrients. Deficiencies of any single one of them can cause serious health problems over time. Weak bones, diminish immune function, failing memory, loss of eyesight and many other “diseases of aging” are often the result of decreased stomach function.

Ulcers can even be caused by too little acid. Surprised? We know today that most ulcers are caused by a bacterium called h. pylori. This little beastie is killed by strong stomach acid. But when stomach acid is weak, watch out! Weak stomach acid is how h. pylori gets a foot-hold. (People with active ulcers should not supplement hydrochloric acid until the ulcer has healed).

Diseases Associated with Low Gastric Function

Low stomach acid is associated with the following conditions:

  • Acne rosacea
  • Addison’s disease
  • Allergic reactions
  • Candidiasis (chronic)
  • Cardiac arrhythmias
  • Celiac disease
  • Childhood asthma
  • Chronic autoimmune hepatitis
  • Chronic cough
  • Dermatitis herpeteformis
  • Diabetes (type I)
  • Eczema
  • Gallbladder disease
  • GERD
  • Graves disease (hyperthyroid)
  • Iron deficiency anemia
  • Laryngitis (chronic)
  • Lupus erythromatosis
  • Macular degeneration
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Muscle Cramps
  • Myasthenia gravis
  • Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC)
  • Osteoporosis
  • Pernicious anemia
  • Polymyalgia rheumatica
  • Reynaud’s syndrome
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Scleroderma
  • Sjogren’s syndrome
  • Stomach cancer
  • Ulcerative colitis
  • Vitiligo

It also appears that many cases of depression, which appear related to too little neurotransmitters (which in turn are made from amino acids) may in fact be inability to absorb the necessary precursors due to – you guessed it – low stomach acid. I suspect there are a large number of other diseases that begin with a failing digestive system and that have not yet been recognized as such.

Even so, many people who have low stomach acid do not have symptoms of heartburn, “acid indigestion” or GERD.

The Gastric Acid Function Test

Here’s a simple question. Before your doctor diagnosed GERD from “too much stomach acid,” did he/she perform a stomach acid function test?

X-rays and gastroscopy do not evaluate stomach acid production. The medical test for stomach acid, called the Heidelberg test, requires swallowing a small capsule and then having it pulled back up on a “string.” You’d remember if you had this done. Interestingly, this test is ALMOST NEVER PERFORMED before excess stomach acid is diagnosed, hence the incorrect diagnosis!

Why The Blind Spot In Medicine?

From the 1800’s up until the 1950’s, hydrochloric acid (HCl) supplements (both with and without pepsin) were widely prescribed and used. Physicians simply considered replacement of digestive acid to be like replacement of thyroid hormone for a failing thyroid or hormone replacement for aging ovaries.

In the 1950’s, some badly designed and misinterpreted “research” was used to convince physicians that HCl and pepsin replacement therapy is unnecessary. Besides, the “replacement” therapy – HCL and pepsin – are natural substances that are difficult to patent. Instead, drug companies focused on patentable drugs to treat “hyperchlorhydria” (excess stomach acid), and the highly profitable prescription and OTC acid blocking drug industry was born.

Once again I ask: if a doctor diagnosed you with excess stomach acid, did he or she actually perform the Heidelberg test? If you diagnosed yourself, did you perform a gastric acid self-test? No? I rest my case.

The Gastric Acid Function Self-Test

Fortunately, the Heidelberg test is not required to arrive at a correct diagnosis of too little stomach acid. You can perform a gastric acid self-test at home using some betain HCL capsules taken with meals. If digestion improves – bingo! You’re hydrochloric acid deficient.

This issue of low stomach acid is central to so many diseases that I recommend a gastric acid self-test to EVERYONE over age 50 and anyone under age 50 who has any medical complaint related to nutrient deficiency.

I’ve put together an inexpensive yet highly effective “Gastric Acid Function Self Test Kit” that includes full instructions for testing your own stomach acid (it’s easy with the instructions) plus “test sizes” of the supplements – including hydrochloric acid and pepsin – needed for the test.

Testing your own digestive function is simple and easy, and it could save you much grief, sickness, and yes, heartburn.

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