Tocotrienols


The “Other” Vitamin E

Tocotrienols“Vitamin E” is actually a mixture of tocotrienols and tocopherols, two forms of the same vitamin. Like tocopherols (the “classic” vitamin E), tocotrienols are also potent antioxidants that protect against lipid peroxidation (the damaging of fats by free radicals).

Research has shown that although tocotrienols and tocopherols possess similar activity, they work slightly differently in the body. The very newest research shows that tocotrienols may be even more valuable to good health than the classic form of vitamin E, tocopherols.

Actions of tocotrienols:

  • cholesterol-lowering properties not seen with regular vitamin E (tocopherols).
  • Tocotrienols reduce AGEs (advanced glycosylated end-products),
  • encourage healthy blood pressure levels and arterial health
  • support normal blood sugar balance
  • prevent fat oxidation

Both gamma- and delta-tocotrienols are powerful antioxidants working at the cells’ surface. Evidence indicates that tocotrienols are absorbed better than tocopherols.

The typical recommendation is 140 to 360 mg per day. Most studies have used 200 mg daily.

Contains: Tocotrienols 100 mg ( 90% Delta- Tocotrienols and 10% Gamma- Tocotrienols)

Other ingredients: Rice bran oil, gelatin, glycerin, water.

Suggested Dose: 1 or 2 softgels, one or two times daily or as directed by a healthcare practitioner.

References:

1. Kamal-Eldin A, Appelqvist LA. The chemistry and antioxidant properties of tocopherols and tocotrienols. Lipids 1996;31:671–701 [review].
2. Kamat JP, Devasagayam TPA. Tocotrienols from palm oil as potent inhibitors of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation in rat brain mitochondria. Neurosci Lett 1995;195:179–82.
3. Sen CK, Khanna S, Roy S. Tocotrienols: Vitamin E beyond tocopherols. Life Sci. 2006;78:2088-98.
4.) Schaffer S, Muller WE, and Eckert GP. Tocotrienols: constitutional effects in aging and disease. J Nutr. 2005;135:151-4.
5.) Theriault A, Chao JT, Wang Q, et al. Tocotrienol: a review of its therapeutic potential. Clin Biochem 1999;32:309–19 [review].

Whey Protein

Boost Immunity with Nature’s Superior Protein

Whey protein provides a biologically superior protein with natural immune factors, including lactoferrin and immunoglobulins.

In cancer medicine, whey has been found to offer “considerable protection to the host” over that of other types of protein, including soy, especially during chemotherapy and radiation. At low concentrations, whey inhibits the growth of breast cell cancer. Whey also protects cellular glutathione (a body-produced antioxidant) in normal cells during radiation therapy. This effect is not seen with other proteins.

For those with weak immune systems, or people who need to gain weight, whey is an easy way to get high quality protein and immune factors. For those on weight-loss diets, whey (such as a “Super Shake” below), makes a low calorie, low carb, high nutrient meal replacement. Try my recipe — it really tastes like an ice-cream milkshake!

Whey protein is beneficial for:

  • weight loss programs
  • weight and muscle gain programs
  • immune function
  • cancer
  • liver disease

My SuperShake recipe can be found here, and is a perfect way to get all of the benefits of whey and more!

Hot Chocolate

1 scoop chocolate whey
8 ounces hot water
1 scoop L-glutamine
(optional, for weight gain or GI repair)
To make
Heat water. Stir in whey powder. Drink. Enjoy.

Apple Pan Dowdy Pudding

2 scoops vanilla whey
2 tsps. Ez-Fiber
2 tsps. ground flax seed
Optional
1 scoop L-glutamine
1/8 cup chopped nuts
1 chopped apple
To make
Combine above ingredients. Add 8 ounces hot water. Stir. Put in cups. Enjoy hot or cold. Makes 2 servings.


Syntrax Vanilla Whey

Vanilla WheyThis Whey Powder Is A Great Combination Of High Quality And Economical Price.

Sustained-Release Protein Blend
Undenatured Whey Protein, Micellar Casein & Egg Albumin
Vital Nutrition for Health & Recovery
Best Tasting Protein…Guaranteed
Glutamine Peptides
Mixes Instantly
Aspartame Free

Perfect For Low Carb Dieters!

Syntrax VANILLA Whey
Product # 8050 (2.17 lbs or about 36 servings)
$39.97

Syntrax CHOCOLATE Whey
Product # 8051 ((2.17 lbs or about 36 servings)
$39.97

Syntrax Vanilla Whey

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 1 Level Scoop (30 g)
Servings per Container: 30
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Calories110
Calories from Fat15
Total Fat1.5 g2%
Saturated Fat1 g5%
Trans Fat0 g
Cholesterol40 mg13%
Sodium80 mg3%
Potassium200 mg6%
Total Carbohydrates2 g1%
Dietary Fiber0 g0%
Sugars2 g
Protein23 g46%
Vitamin A0%
Vitamin C0%
Calcium15%
Iron0%
Phosphorus10%
Magnesium6%
Important Amino Acids Per 100 Grams of Protein
Arginine2.5 g*
Glutamine8.4 g*
Histidine2.1 g*
Isoleucine5.8 g*
Leucine10.3 g*
Lysine8.7 g*
Methionine2.2 g*
Phenylalanine3.6 g*
Threonine6.4 g*
Tryptophan1.9 g*
Valine6 g*
*Daily value not established.
Other Ingredients: Protein blend (whey protein concentrate, milk protein concentrate, egg albumin, hydrolyzed wheat gluten), natural and artificial flavors, soy lecithin, salt, acesulfame-K, sucralose.

Syntrax Chocolate Whey

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 1 Level Scoop (32 g)
Servings per Container: 31
Amount Per Serving% Daily Value
Calories120
Calories from Fat20
Total Fat2 g3%
Saturated Fat1 g5%
Trans Fat0 g
Cholesterol40 mg13%
Sodium130 mg5%
Potassium280 mg8%
Total Carbohydrates3 g1%
Dietary Fiber1 g4%
Sugars2 g
Protein23 g46%
Vitamin A0%
Vitamin C0%
Calcium15%
Iron4%
Phosphorus10%
Magnesium8%
Important Amino Acids Per 100 Grams of Protein
Arginine2.5 g*
Glutamine8.4 g*
Histidine2.1 g*
Isoleucine5.8 g*
Leucine10.3 g*
Lysine8.7 g*
Methionine2.2 g*
Phenylalanine3.6 g*
Threonine6.4 g*
Tryptophan1.9 g*
Valine6 g*
*Daily value not established.
Other Ingredients: Protein blend (whey protein concentrate, milk protein concentrate, egg albumin, hydrolyzed wheat gluten), dutch processed cocoa powder, natural and artificial flavors, soy lecithin, salt, acesulfame-K, sucralose.


Vitamin A


The Healthy Skin and Eye Vitamin

Vitamin A and carotenes are a widespread group of plant pigments that serve as antioxidants in the body. Vitamin A is important for bone formation, skin health, and vision. Deficiencies of Vitamin A are associated with night blindness, dry eyes, and skin diseases.

The optimal adult dose range is 5,000-10,000 IU. Higher doses of pre-formed vitamin A can accumulate in the body and become toxic. Carotene supplements are a safe and effective way to obtain vitamin A activity without toxicity.

Fish liver oils are a good dietary source of vitamin A.

Caution: Do not take more than 50,000 IU per day for 3 months without medical supervision. Pregnant women or women who may become pregnant are advised not to take more than 5,000IU per day of vitamin A.

Beta Carotene: Fat-soluble Antioxidant Vitamin

Carotenes are plant pigments with vitamin A and antioxidant activity. They perform many functions, including maintenance of eye health, cancer and cardiovascular disease prevention, immune-system enhancement and skin/epithelial health.

Dr. Myatt’s comment: Use only natural beta carotene. Synthetic carotenes have been shown to have negative health effects.

 

Vitamins and Mineral Supplements

Your Concise Guide To Nutritional Supplements

Definitions

Vitamins are organic compounds that are necessary for human life and health. Vitamins cannot be manufactured in the body (vitamin B12 is an exception) and so must be obtained from diet.

Minerals are inorganic ions (metals) that are also necessary for life and health. Minerals are not manufactured in the body and so must be obtained from diet.

Trace minerals are minerals necessary to the body in extremely small, or “trace,” amounts.

Accessory nutrients are substances that are not absolutely necessary for life and health (as vitamins and minerals are), but that participate with vitamins and minerals in numerous biochemical reactions.

Vitamins: What You Should be Taking, and Why

Taking vitamins is a wise health and prevention measure. Deficiencies of vitamins and minerals cause many diseases. Adding vitamins and minerals in supplemental form is an inexpensive “insurance policy” against some of the worst diseases of modern times.

A deficiency of vitamins and minerals are associated with these diseases:

A deficiency of antioxidant vitamins and minerals (especially beta carotene, vitamins C & E, and selenium) is associated with higher incidence of cancers of the colon, breast, prostate, mouth, lungs and skin. Some researchers believe that antioxidant vitamin and mineral deficiencies may be related to higher incidence of all cancers.

A mineral deficiency, especially magnesium and potassium but also calcium, is associated with high blood pressure.

Deficiencies of vitamins E, C, B6, B12, folic acid (a B vitamin), and bioflavonoids are associated with cardiovascular disease. The connection between vitamin E and heart health is so well established that conventional medical cardiologists are instructed to recommend vitamin E to their patients.

Healthy bones, and the prevention of osteoporosis, depend on sufficient levels of minerals, including calcium, magnesium, boron, zinc, copper, B vitamins, and vitamin D.

In males, benign prostatic hypertrophy is associated with decreased levels of zinc. Zinc deficiency also correlates to decreased immune function. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and diabetes (high blood sugar) occur more frequently in people who are chromium deficient. After diabetes is present, low levels of vitamins A, C, E, plus zinc, selenium, choline, bioflavonoids and B complex vitamins are associated with more complications from the disease.

This list could go on for pages, but you get the idea. A deficiencyof key vitamins and mineralsare correlated with disease. Such vitamin deficiencies are also common in the modern American diet. Depleted soils result in lowered vitamin and mineral content in produce AND Americans eat less fresh produce than ever before. Much of our food is highly processed, removing not only vitamins and minerals but also fiber and enzymes.

The best health insurance may not be an expensive medical policy, but the addition of sufficient vitamins to fill in the gaps in our day-to-day nutritional status.

Some people take a wide array of individual and/or exotic supplements, but these should NOT replace a basic, healthful level of vitamin supplementation. I have listed the best and most complete formulas for basic multiple vitamin and mineral supplementation. I recommend this for all adults over age 18. If you have a special medical condition, consult an holistic physician for further recommendations. (See Telephone Consultations with Dr. Myatt)

Basic Vitamins and Minerals Supplement Program (For health maintenance in healthy individuals OR as the basis of a health program in those with known health problems). 1) Multi Vitamin / Mineral formula without iron (unless your doctor has specifically told you to take iron). There is no such thing as a good multiple vitamin supplement in a single pill. Optimal daily dosage levels of essential vitamins and minerals do not fit into one tablet or capsule. Expect to be taking 6 to 9 capsules or tablets to fulfill Optimal Daily Doses of key vitamins.

Modern Dietetics In A Nutshell

Nutritional Deficiencies

It has long been recognized that the human body will not function efficiently without vitamins and minerals. In fact, serious diseases and death result when nutrient levels become too low. Because vitamins and minerals are necessary for every chemical reaction in the body, an excess or deficiency can greatly alter physical function.

“RDA’s” (nutrient levels recommended by the U.S. Department of Agriculture) are sufficient to prevent serious deficiency-caused illnesses. (Rickets due to vitamin D deficiency, for example). They are not sufficient for optimal health and well-being.

Many scientists today agree that higher levels of certain nutrients are necessary to protect us from disease. It is also an accepted fact that even small deficiencies of nutrients can result in a decline in physical health, often before modern medicine can name a “disease.” Such deficiencies are called “subclinical,” (meaning “before they are a diagnosable illness”) and are the precursors to more serious illness.

The Standard American Diet (S.A.D.) is typically excessive in calories while being deficient in vitamins, minerals, and accessory nutrients. This is probably due to several factors: easy availability of refined-flour, high sugar foods; extensive processing of foods (which removes nutrients and fiber); and plant foods grown in mineral-deficient soils.

In addition, increased environmental exposure to toxic substances increases the body’s need for certain nutrients, especially antioxidants. (See Antioxidants.)

To ensure that you are obtaining optimal dietary nutrient levels, examine your current diet in view of the vitamin/mineral/accessory nutrient guide below. Keep a three-day diet diary to assist in calculating your baseline level of nutrient intake. Then, make dietary changes and take nutritional supplements as needed to ensure daily optimal nutrient intake.

Which Vitamin Formula is Right For You?

If you are a: Multiple Formula Antioxidants Comments Man Maxi Multi OR Once Daily MyPacks Included in Maxi Multi and MyPacks A separate antioxidant is usually needed with other multiples, not with these. Woman of Childbearing Age Nutrizyme with iron (see comment) OR Once Daily MyPacks Included in Maxi Multi and MyPacks Take a multiple WITH iron if you have heavy menstrual flow. Post-Menopausal Woman Maxi Multi OR Once Daily MyPacks Included in Maxi Multi and MyPacks Take additional Cal-Mag Amino to total 1200-1500 mg calcium per day if you are at risk for Osteoporosis. Senior Maxi Multi OR Nutrizyme with iron (see comments) Included in Maxi Multi and MyPacks Take a formula with iron only if directed to do so by your doctor. Children Children’s Multi-Vitamin and Minerals Children’s Antioxidants Specially formulated for children ages 4-12.

Vitamins

vitamin major functions major deficiency associations optimal adult dose range best food sources cautions/
notes
vitamin A bone formation
skin health vision night blindness, dry eyes,
skin diseases 5,000-10,000 IU fish liver oils Do not take more than 50,000 IU per day for 3 months without medical supervision.

beta-carotene

converted to vitamin A in the body; antioxidant ulcerative colitis, skin diseases, smoking 10,000-50,000 IU green and yellow vegetables; carrots Use only natural beta-carotene; high doses may cause yellow skin (harmless).

vitamin D

increases calcium absorption;
decreases overall mortality rate osteoporosis, rheumatic pains, dental disease,
cancer,
impaired immunity 800-5,000 IU or as
directed by a physician. SUNSHINE! fish liver oil egg yolk The current daily dose of 400IU may be be set too low for optimal health.

vitamin E (tocopherol)

cellular respiration; antioxidant heart disease neurological aging 200-800 IU wheat germ oil, nuts, whole grains, egg yolk Doses over
800 IU day may elevate triglycerides.

vitamin K

blood clotting factor; bone formation osteoporosis 20-100 mcg broccoli, spinach, green tea, green cabbage, tomato Do not supplement if you are on anti-epileptic medication.

vitamin C

collagen synthesis, anti-viral, wound healing, antioxidant joint pain/arthritis, atherosclerosis, bleeding gums, decreased immunity 300-3,000 mg broccoli, red pepper, citrus fruits, cabbage At high doses, vitamin C will loosen the bowels.

vitamin B1 (thiamine)

energy processes fatigue, mental confusion, neuropathy 5-100 mg eggs, berries, nuts, legumes, liver, yeast Nontoxic.

vitamin B2 (riboflavin)

energy processes, wound healing, activates other B vitamins infection, cataracts, blurred vision, eye surgery 5-100 mg green leafy vegetables, eggs, organ meats Nontoxic. Higher doses will make urine a harmless, bright yellow.

vitamin B3 (niacin)

energy processes depression, tension headaches, memory loss 20-100 mg milk, eggs, fish, whole meal wheat flour Doses greater than 50mg may cause a skin flush. Take high doses only with doctors supervision.

vitamin B5(pantothenic acid)

energy processes; adrenal gland function allergies, morning stiffness; fatigue; muscle cramps 10-1,000 mg eggs, yeast, liver No known toxicity.

vitamin B6(pyridoxine)

energy processes; antibody formation insomnia, irritability, atherosclerosis 5-200 mg wheat germ, yeast, whole grains Oral contraceptive use increases need for this vitamin.

Folic acid

red blood cell formation, RNA/DNA synthesis fatigue, depression, atherosclerosis 200-800 mcg beans, green leafy veggies, yeast Do not take with Phenobarbital or dilantin.

vitamin B12

red blood cell formation; energy processes atherosclerosis, memory loss, GI symptoms 10-1,200 mcg fermented soy products; root veggies Nontoxic.

Biotin

energy processes; blood sugar regulation muscle pain, depression 300-600 mcg egg yolks, whole wheat No known toxicity.

Minerals

Mineral: functions deficiency associations adult dose range food sources cautions

*Calcium

bone & tooth formation; heart & muscle function osteoporosis, bone spurs, muscle cramps, rheumatism 200-1500 mg barley, kale, unrefined grains; milk, green veggies Prolonged excess may cause a mineral imbalance.

*Magnesium

energy processes, nerve function, enzyme activation stress, senility, osteoporosis, insomnia 150-600 mg avocados, almonds, whole grains, grapefruit Doses over 400 mg can cause diarrhea in some people.

Potassium

pH balance, nerve function stress, atherosclerosis, high blood pressure 1800-5625* mg * a normal diet should contain sufficient potassium potato peel, bananas, beans, almonds, whole grains Do not take high supplemental doses (food Sources are O.K.) when taking heart medicine without physician guidance.

Sodium

pH balance, nerve function Excess is more common and is assoc with high blood pressure limit daily intake to 1,500 mg okra, celery, black mission figs Very few people (athletes, diarrhea /vomiting) need to supplement.

Phosphorus

energy production, bones/teeth, B Vit. activation tooth/gum disorders, impotence, equilibrium 300-600 mg barley, beans, fish, lentils, dark green veggies Prolonged, large doses can cause calcium deficiency or mineral imbalance.

Iron

Red Blood cell production dizziness, depression, anemia 10-30 mg blackberries, cherries, spinach Do NOT take iron unless told to do so by your doctor. Iron excess is associated with health problems.

*Zinc

co-factor in numerous metabolic processes prostate enlargement, immune deficiency; atherosclerosis 15-50 mg wheat germ, wheat bran, pumpkin seed, avocado, sea food Large doses (50mg, day) can cause a copper deficiency & other mineral imbalances.

*Copper

Red blood cell production; skeletal, heart & muscle function osteoporosis, digestive function, nerve disorders 2-3 mg green leafy veggies, almonds, beans, sea food Higher doses can be toxic.

*Manganese

glandular function, bone & ligament health  diabetes, asthma, digestive disturbance 2-10 mg nuts, seeds, avocados, grapefruit, apricots High doses may create other mineral imbalances.

*Chromium

glucose metabolism; blood sugar regulation; heart function atherosclerosis, diabetes, hypoglycemia, high cholesterol, overweight 200-500 mcg whole grain cereals, molasses, meat, yeast Nontoxic at therapeutic levels.

*Selenium

antioxidant, synergistic with vitamin E cancer prevention; aging 100-200 mcg bran, whole grains, tuna, broccoli, onion Prolonged excess may be toxic. * indicates minerals most often deficient in the diet. Other minerals not marked with a * usually do not need to be supplemented. Other minerals and trace minerals include: molybdenum, flourine, chlorine, cobalt, silicon, boron, sulphur, vanadium

ACCESSORY NUTRIENTS

Bioflavonoids – compounds found in most plants in association with vitamin C. Bioflavonoids are potent antioxidants. Higher dietary levels are useful in heart disease and atherosclerosis, bleeding gums, weak immune system, inflammation, varicose veins, hayfever.

CoQ10 – (ubiquinone) A naturally-occurring compound in the human body that is a vital co-factor in energy production. Conditions benefited by increased CoQ10 levels include: cardiovascular disease, angina, congestive heart failure, mitral valve prolapse, immune deficiency, obesity, diabetes, periodontal disease, cancer, muscular dystrophy. Also use in longevity and rejuvenation programs.

Fiber – Plant cell walls present in whole grains, legumes, fruits and vegetables. This part of the plant is usually lost in processing. Fiber deficiency is associated with numerous illnesses: obesity, atherosclerosis, diabetes, gallstones, varicose veins, constipation, diverticulosis, irritable bowel, colon cancer, high blood pressure and high cholesterol.

FOS (fructooligosaccharides) Naturally- occurring sugar-like substances that act as food to friendly GI bacteria. In human body cells, this substance is not utilized as energy (or as a true sugar), but to probiotic gut bacteria, FOS is a banquet. The addition of FOS to probiotic formulas (as in Enterogenic concentrate, product # 218), helps good bacteria re-colonize the GI tract faster and more plentifully.

Friendly bacteria – (probiotics) The naturally-occurring bacteria of the colon help protect us from many conditions, including candidiasis, allergies, constipation, B12 vitamin deficiency. These good bacteria are damaged or destroyed by dietary imbalances, antibiotic and other drug use. Replacement of good bacteria results in improved colon function.

Glucosamine sulfate – A naturally occurring substance that has been found to be highly effective in treating osteoarthritis. It acts both to reduce pain and to stimulate joint repair.

5-Hydroxy-Tryptophan-(5-HTP)
5-HTP is the intermediate metabolite of the amino acid L-tryptophan. This amino acid intermediate participates in the body’s production of serotonin. It also stimulates increased endorphin, melatonin, norepinephrine and dopamine production. These brain chemicals (neuro-transmitters) help increase energy, improve mood and sleep, and decrease appetite. Useful for insomnia, mood disorder (anxiety/depression) and weight loss programs.

L-Carnitine – an amino acid that is crucial to normal energy production and fat metabolism. Carnitine has been shown to benefit atherosclerotic heart disease and high cholesterol and triglycerides. Improves fat metabolism throughout the body.

L-Glutathione – A tri peptide (3 amino acids) that acts as a potent antioxidant in the body. Supplementation is useful in allergies, cancer prevention, liver detoxification, cataracts, heavy metal toxicity, longevity and rejuvenation.

Omega-3 Oils are derived from fatty fish and flax seeds. These fatty acids are anti-inflammatory and have a positive effect on cardiovascular disease, including high cholesterol and high blood pressure, allergic and inflammatory conditions (including psoriasis and eczema), autoimmune diseases, cancer, neurological disease, menopause, general health enhancement.

Omega-6 Oils found in evening primrose, black currant, borage and a number of vegetable oils. Although supplementation is popular, these oils increase arachadonic acid levels (an inflammatory substance). Only diabetics need to supplement very small doses of this oil. (less than 500mg/day).

RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS


Natural Support For A Potentially Debilitating Condition

Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory condition of the joints where the body’s own immune system “attacks” joint tissue. It is classified as an autoimmune disease for this reason. A number of factors have been implicated in such an autoimmune reaction.

Autoimmune diseases in general relate to some combination of genetic factors, nutritional deficiencies, food allergy, increased intestinal permeability, altered bowel flora, intestinal parasites, stress and environmental factors. Any combination of these may be involved.

It is advisable to seek the help of a qualified alternative medicine practitioner who can help you explore these causes. Conventional medical treatment relies on immune-suppressing drugs as a mainstay of therapy, but recent studies have demonstrated immune deficiency defects in patients with RA in spite of the excess inflammatory condition exhibited toward joints. Conventional treatment does not address this immune deficiency and in most instances actually makes it worse.

Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations

  • Follow the Ten Rules for Good Health. Avoid red meat and fowl; emphasize fish.
  • Evaluate for food allergies.
  • Drink 64 ounces of pure water daily.
  • Practice Relaxation techniques. Stress aggravates autoimmune conditions in general. Please watch The Body/Mind Connection video several times for information and insights into the stress/disease connection.

Primary Support

  • Maxi Multi: 3 caps, 3 times per day with meals. Optimal (not minimal) doses of antioxidants (A,C,E,beta carotene, selenium), manganese, pantothenic acid and zinc are particularly important in treating rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Omega 3 fatty acids:
    Flax seed meal, 2 teaspoons per day with food
    OR
    Flax seed capsules: 2-4 caps, 3 times per day (target dose range: 6-12 caps per day)
    OR
    Flax seed oil: 1 tablespoon per day
    OR
    Max EPA (Omega-3 rich fish oil): 1-2 caps, 3 times per day with meals (target dose: 3-6 caps per day).
  • Similase: 2 caps, 3 times per day with meals.
  • MSM (750-1,000mg): 1 cap, 3 times per day with meals.
  • Bromelain: 2 caps, 3-4 times per day between meals for 4 weeks, then decrease to 1 cap, 3-4 times per day between meals thereafter.

Additional Support

  • DHEA: 200-400mg daily in divided doses. A dose this high should be taken only after having a hormone profile performed. (Best to use at this dose with a physician’s guidance).
    AND (Take any or ALL of the following):
  • Grape Seed Extract (50-100mg): 1 capsule, 3 times per day with meals. [Target dose: 150-300mg per day].
  • Turmeric (curcumin): 1 cap, 4 times per day between meals. [Target dose: 1,200mg per day].
  • Ginger: 1-2 caps, 3-4 times per day. [Target dose: 500-1,000mg per day. Faster improvement has been reported in people who took double this dose, without negative side-effects].

Tests

  • Male or female hormone profile: this should always be performed at the initiation of treatment.
  • Comprehensive Digestive Stool Analysis (CDSA) should be performed. Altered bowel flora and /or incomplete digestion are common in RA and should be evaluated and corrected.
  • Increased Intestinal Permeability (IP): Altered gut permeability, from drugs, altered bowel flora, deficient digestive enzymes, stress and environmental factors, plays heavily in RA. This should be evaluated and corrected if an abnormality is found.
  • Gastric Acid Self-Test: should be conducted. Low digestive function, including low gastric acid production, is a common finding and felt to be contributory to RA.

Dr. Myatt’s Comment

RA can be greatly improved through natural means, but it is important to consult a qualified health practitioner who can help you. I am available for telephone consultations.

 

Soy (Glycine max)


Hormone, Bone Health and Cholesterol Balance

Soy isoflavoneSoy and its major components daidzein and genistein, has estrogenic effects and can acts as an  estrogen-modulator in both men and women. Soy also has cholesterol-lowering, antioxidant and anti-cancer effects.

Soy has been shown to:

  • lower the risk of cardiovascular disease
    (a health claim allowed by the FDA) 24-27
  • exert anti-cancer effects (may help prevent and even treat cancer, especially breast and prostate cancer) 10-23
  • lower cholesterol levels 1-9
  • increase bone density and decrease bone mineral loss 28-33
  • improve insulin sensitivity 34-35
  • improve menopausal symptoms 36-40
  • possess antioxidant properties 41-45

Soy may therefore be useful in:

  • Cancer prevention and treatment
  • Heart disease
  • High cholesterol
  • Menopause symptoms
  • Osteoporosis prevention and treatment

Allergy to soy can cause bowel gas and discomfort; raw soy products may inhibit thyroid function. In sensitive individuals, the benefits of soy may be obtained and the GI effects avoided by using the purified soy capsules.

Soy Extract (Isoflavone-250) Soy Isoflavones Benefit Both Women & Men

Beneficial substances in soy, (isoflavones, diadzen, and genisteins) have been shown to lower cholesterol levels, normalize male and female hormone balance, and prevent cancer. Soy is also used in the treatment of cancer, especially prostate and some types of breast cancers. (Physician guidance highly recommended here as soy can increase hormone levels when this is not desired).

Suggested dose: 1cap, once or twice per day with a meal. Higher doses may be used if needed to relieve menopausal hot flashes or as recommended by a physician for treatment of cancer or cholesterol levels.

References:

1.) Xiao CW, Mei J, Wood CM. Effect of soy proteins and isoflavones on lipid
metabolism and involved gene expression. Front Biosci. 2008 Jan
1;13:2660-73.
2.) Taku K, Umegaki K, Sato Y, Taki Y, Endoh K, Watanabe S. Soy isoflavones lower serum total and LDL cholesterol in humans: a meta-analysis of 11 randomized controlled trials. Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Apr;85(4):1148-56.
3.) Torres N, Torre-Villalvazo I, Tovar AR. Regulation of lipid metabolism by
soy protein and its implication in diseases mediated by lipid disorders. J
Nutr Biochem. 2006 Jun;17(6):365-73. Epub 2005 Dec 5.
4.) Zhan S, Ho SC. Meta-analysis of the effects of soy protein containing
isoflavones on the lipid profile. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Feb;81(2):397-408.
5.) Zhuo XG, Melby MK, Watanabe S. Soy isoflavone intake lowers serum LDL
cholesterol: a meta-analysis of 8 randomized controlled trials in humans. J
Nutr. 2004 Sep;134(9):2395-400.
6.) Dalais FS, Ebeling PR, Kotsopoulos D, McGrath BP, Teede HJ. The effects of soy protein containing isoflavones on lipids and indices of bone resorption in postmenopausal women. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2003 Jun;58(6):704-9.
7.) Tonstad S, Smerud K, Høie L. A comparison of the effects of 2 doses of soy protein or casein on serum lipids, serum lipoproteins, and plasma total
homocysteine in hypercholesterolemic subjects. Am J Clin Nutr. 2002
Jul;76(1):78-84.
8.) Wangen KE, Duncan AM, Xu X, Kurzer MS. Soy isoflavones improve plasma lipids in normocholesterolemic and mildly hypercholesterolemic postmenopausal women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2001 Feb;73(2):225-31.
9.) Teixeira SR, Potter SM, Weigel R, et al. Effects of feeding 4 levels of soy
protein for 3 and 6 wk on blood lipids and apolipoproteins in moderately
hypercholesterolemic men. Am J Clin Nutr 2000;71:1077–84.
10.) Pendleton JM, Tan WW, Anai S, Chang M, Hou W, Shiverick KT, Rosser CJ. Phase II trial of isoflavone in prostate-specific antigen recurrent prostate cancer after previous local therapy. BMC Cancer. 2008 May 11;8:132.
11.) Banerjee S, Li Y, Wang Z, Sarkar FH. Multi-targeted therapy of cancer by
genistein. Cancer Lett. 2008 May 18. [Epub ahead of
print].[###antioxidant###]
12.) Subbiah U, Raghunathan M. Chemoprotective action of resveratrol and genistein from apoptosis induced in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. J Biomol Struct Dyn. 2008 Feb;25(4):425-34.
13.) Kampkötter A, Wiegand C, Timpel C, Röhrdanz E, Chovolou Y, Kahl R, Wätjen W. Increased expression of catalase in human hepatoma cells by the soy isoflavone, daidzein. Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol. 2008 May;102(5):437-42. Epub 2007 Nov 28.
14.) Vaishampayan U, Hussain M, Banerjee M, Seren S, Sarkar FH, Fontana J, Forman JD, Cher ML, Powell I, Pontes JE, Kucuk O. Lycopene and soy isoflavones in the treatment of prostate cancer. Nutr Cancer. 2007;59(1):1-7.
15.) Sarkar FH, Adsule S, Padhye S, Kulkarni S, Li Y. The role of genistein and synthetic derivatives of isoflavone in cancer prevention and therapy. Mini
Rev Med Chem. 2006 Apr;6(4):401-7.
16.) Kumar NB, Cantor A, Allen K, Riccardi D, Besterman-Dahan K, Seigne J, Helal M, Salup R, Pow-Sang J. The specific role of isoflavones in reducing prostate cancer risk. Prostate. 2004 May 1;59(2):141-7.
17.) Yamamoto S, Sobue T, Kobayashi M, Sasaki S, Tsugane S; Japan Public Health Center-Based Prospective Study on Cancer Cardiovascular Diseases Group. Soy, isoflavones, and breast cancer risk in Japan. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2003 Jun 18;95(12):906-13.
18.) Sarkar FH, Li Y. Soy isoflavones and cancer prevention. Cancer Invest.
2003;21(5):744-57.
19.) Hussain M, Banerjee M, Sarkar FH, Djuric Z, Pollak MN, Doerge D, Fontana J, Chinni S, Davis J, Forman J, Wood DP, Kucuk O. Soy isoflavones in the treatment of prostate cancer. Nutr Cancer. 2003;47(2):111-7.
20.) Sarkar FH, Li Y. Mechanisms of cancer chemoprevention by soy isoflavone genistein. Cancer Metastasis Rev. 2002;21(3-4):265-80.
21.) Lamartiniere CA, Cotroneo MS, Fritz WA, Wang J, Mentor-Marcel R, Elgavish A. Genistein chemoprevention: timing and mechanisms of action in murine mammary and prostate. J Nutr. 2002 Mar;132(3):552S-558S.
22.) Lamartiniere CA. Protection against breast cancer with genistein: a
component of soy. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000 Jun;71(6 Suppl):1705S-7S; discussion 1708S-9S.
23.) Messina MJ, Persky V, Setchell KD, Barnes S. Soy intake and cancer risk: a review of the in vitro and in vivo data. Nutr Cancer 1994;21:113–31.
24.) Rimbach G, Boesch-Saadatmandi C, Frank J, Fuchs D, Wenzel U, Daniel H, Hall WL, Weinberg PD. Dietary isoflavones in the prevention of cardiovascular disease–a molecular perspective. Food Chem Toxicol. 2008 Apr;46(4):1308-19. Epub 2007 Jul 3.
25.) Clair RS, Anthony M. Soy, isoflavones and atherosclerosis. Handb Exp
Pharmacol. 2005;(170):301-23.
26.) Cassidy A, de Pascual Teresa S, Rimbach G. Molecular mechanisms by which dietary isoflavones potentially prevent atherosclerosis. Expert Rev Mol Med. 2003 Sep 30;5(24):1-15.
27.) Clarkson TB. Soy, soy phytoestrogens and cardiovascular disease. J Nutr.2002 Mar;132(3):566S-569S.
28.) Ma DF, Qin LQ, Wang PY, Katoh R. Soy isoflavone intake increases bone mineral density in the spine of menopausal women: meta-analysis of
randomized controlled trials. Clin Nutr. 2008 Feb;27(1):57-64. Epub 2007 Dec
11.
29.) Harkness LS, Fiedler K, Sehgal AR, Oravec D, Lerner E. Decreased bone
resorption with soy isoflavone supplementation in postmenopausal women. J
Womens Health (Larchmt). 2004 Nov;13(9):1000-7.
30.) Messina M, Ho S, Alekel DL. Skeletal benefits of soy isoflavones: a review of the clinical trial and epidemiologic data. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab
Care. 2004 Nov;7(6):649-58.
31.) Chen YM, Ho SC, Lam SS, Ho SS, Woo JL. Soy isoflavones have a favorable effect on bone loss in Chinese postmenopausal women with lower bone mass: a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2003 Oct;88(10):4740-7.
32.) Messina M, Messina V. Soyfoods, soybean isoflavones, and bone health: a brief overview. J Ren Nutr. 2000 Apr;10(2):63-8.
33.) Alekel DL, Germain AS, Peterson CT, Hanson KB, Stewart JW, Toda T.
Isoflavone-rich soy protein isolate attenuates bone loss in the lumbar spine
of perimenopausal women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000 Sep;72(3):844-52.
34.) Cederroth CR, Vinciguerra M, Gjinovci A, Kühne F, Klein M, et al. Dietary
phytoestrogens activate AMP-activated protein kinase with improvement in
lipid and glucose metabolism. Diabetes. 2008 May;57(5):1176-85. Epub 2008
Apr 16.
35.) Nordentoft I, Jeppesen PB, Hong J, Abudula R, Hermansen K. Increased Insulin Sensitivity and Changes in the Expression Profile of Key Insulin Regulatory Genes and Beta Cell Transcription Factors in Diabetic KKAy-Mice after Feeding with a Soy Bean Protein Rich Diet High in Isoflavone Content. J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Jun 4. [Epub ahead of print]
36.) Cheng G, Wilczek B, Warner M, Gustafsson JA, Landgren BM. Isoflavone
treatment for acute menopausal symptoms. Menopause. 2007 May-Jun;14(3 Pt 1):468-73.
37.) Nahas EA, Nahas-Neto J, Orsatti FL, Carvalho EP, Oliveira ML, Dias R.
Efficacy and safety of a soy isoflavone extract in postmenopausal women: a
randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled study. Maturitas. 2007 Nov
20;58(3):249-58. Epub 2007 Oct 29.
38.) McCarty MF. Isoflavones made simple – genistein’s agonist activity for the
beta-type estrogen receptor mediates their health benefits. Med Hypotheses.
2006;66(6):1093-114. Epub 2006 Mar 2.
39.) Messina M, Hughes C. Efficacy of soyfoods and soybean isoflavone supplements for alleviating menopausal symptoms is positively related to initial hot flush frequency. J Med Food. 2003 Spring;6(1):1-11.
40.) Burke GL, Legault C, Anthony M, Bland DR, Morgan TM, Naughton MJ, Leggett K, Washburn SA, Vitolins MZ. Soy protein and isoflavone effects on vasomotor symptoms in peri- and postmenopausal women: the Soy Estrogen Alternative Study. Menopause. 2003 Mar-Apr;10(2):147-53.
41.) Bertipaglia de Santana M, Mandarino MG, et al. Association between soy and
green tea (Camellia sinensis) diminishes hypercholesterolemia and increases
total plasma antioxidant potential in dyslipidemic subjects. Nutrition. 2008
Jun;24(6):562-8.
42.) Kim NY, Song EJ, Kwon DY, Kim HP, Heo MY. Antioxidant and antigenotoxic activities of Korean fermented soybean. Food Chem Toxicol. 2008 Mar;46(3):1184-9. Epub 2007 Dec 8.
43.) Hämäläinen M, Nieminen R, Vuorela P, Heinonen M, Moilanen E. Anti-inflammatory effects of flavonoids: genistein, kaempferol, quercetin, and daidzein inhibit STAT-1 and NF-kappaB activations, whereas flavone, isorhamnetin, naringenin, and pelargonidin inhibit only NF-kappaB activation along with their inhibitory effect on iNOS expression and NO production in activated macrophages. Mediators Inflamm. 2007;2007:45673.
44.) Hu CC, Hsiao CH, Huang SY, Fu SH, Lai CC, Hong TM, Chen HH, Lu FJ. Antioxidant activity of fermented soybean extract. J Agric Food Chem. 2004 Sep 8;52(18):5735-9.
45.) Cai Q, Rahn RO, Zhang R. Dietary flavonoids, quercetin, luteolin and genistein, reduce oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation and quench free radicals. Cancer Lett. 1997 Oct 28;119(1):99-107.

 

Osteoarthritis (OA, Arthritis)


Safe, Natural Support For This Painful Condition

Osteoarthritis, also known as degenerative joint disease, is a common occurrence in people over age fifty. Weight-bearing joints are most often affected. Early symptoms include pain and stiffness that are worse in the morning or after inactivity. With progression of the disease, movement causes aggravation of symptoms.

Osteoarthritis is caused by a combination of factors, including wear and tear of cartilage, free radical damage to joint material, lack of nutrients, dietary imbalances and dehydration. Drugs used to treat arthritis, NSAIDS, provide temporary symptom relief but accelerate the underlying disease process. They should be used only for short periods of time while corrective measures are being initiated.

Diet And Lifestyle Recommendations

  • Eat cold water fish (salmon, mackerel, halibut) in preference to chicken, beef or pork; eat plenty of green vegetables.
  • Avoid known food allergens. The nightshade family of vegetables (tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, potato) are specific allergens for many people with arthritis. Consider an elimination/challenge diet to evaluate.
  • Achieve and maintain a normal weight. Excess weight puts extra wear and tear on joints.
  • Exercise regularly. Studies have shown a decrease of painful symptoms and an increase in mobility in people who exercise regularly. See BACK PAIN for specific low back exercises.
  • Drink 64 ounces of pure water daily.
  • Do not smoke. Smoking generates high levels of free radicals.

Primary Support

  • Maxi Multi: 3 caps, 3 times per day with meals. Optimal doses (not minimal doses) of vitamin A, C, E, B5, B6, niacin, pantothenic acid, calcium, magnesium, zinc, copper, selenium, boron and vanadium are especially important.
  • Omega 3 fatty acids:
    Flax seed meal, 2 teaspoons per day with food
    OR
    Flax seed capsules
    : 2-4 caps, 3 times per day (target dose range: 6-12 caps per day)
    OR
    Flax seed oil
    : 1 tablespoon per day
    OR
    Max EPA
    (Omega-3 rich fish oil): 1-2 caps, 3 times per day with meals (target dose: 3-6 caps per day).
  • Glucosamine Sulfate: (750mg, pharmaceutical grade): 2 caps, 2 times per day for 6 weeks, then 1 cap, 2 times per day after that. (target dose: 3,000 mg for 8 weeks [until significant improvement is noted] then 1,500 mg per day for maintenance).
  • Grape Seed extract (PCO’s): 50-100 mg, 3 times per day. (Target dose: 150-300 mg per day).

Additional Support

  • MSM (fundamental sulfur): 1,000 mg, 2-3 times per day with meals.
    AND
  • Turmeric: 1 cap, 2-3 times per day between meals, OR Feverfew: 1 cap, 1-2 times per day.

For acute symptoms (While waiting for Glucosamine Sulfate to take effect)

  • Bromelain: 2 caps, 3 times per day between meals for 4 weeks, then 1 cap, 3 times daily thereafter.

Dr. Myatt’s Comment

If self-help measures fail to give improvement in three months, please consult an holistic physician. This is one condition that can be greatly helped and even cured through natural medicine. I am available for telephone consultations

Vitamin D A Special HealthBeat News Report



Vitamin D – You have been reading about it in the news, and you have wondered what is real and what is hype.

Dr. Myatt and Nurse Mark have researched and prepared this special report for HealthBeat News Readers.


Vitamin D — The Short Course

1.) Vit D is produced in our bodies in response to sun exposure. Vit D is also available from food and supplements.

2.) Vit D is FAR more important to health than was previously realized. I’m talking FAR more important.

3.) Vit D deficiency is widespread, including North America, even in sunny climates like Arizona. Many people who think they are getting enough Vitamin D from sunlight are mistaken.

4.) How to Optimize Vit D Levels for Good Health:

I.)  Vit D test, supplement accordingly, re-test

II.) Supplement at 5,000IU for 3 months, then test your levels.

III.) Don’t test, run the risk of being deficient, but take at least 2,000IU total per day. (This is still an extremely conservative dose, but much higher than the RDA of 400IU which hasn’t been changed yet to reflect the newer findings about Vit D). 

5.) Natural ways to obtain Vit D: Foods, supplements and sun exposure.


Vitamin D — Nutrient of the Decade: Are You Getting Enough?

The Consequences of Low Vitamin D

Vitamin D is called “the sunshine Vitamin” because our bodies make it in response to sun exposure.

Vit D is necessary for normal bone formation in both children and adults. In children, deficiencies of Vit D lead to rickets. In adults, deficiencies are associated with osteoporosis and osteomalacia (soft bones), decreased muscle strength and increased risk of fall. (1,12,14,22,43-48)Until recently, the bone-protecting effect was  about all that Vit D was known for, but the past decade of medical research has changed all that.

The newly appreciated Vitamin D deficiency risks include:

1.) heart disease: myocardial infarction, high blood pressure, heart failure, myopathy, sudden cardiac death, stroke (11,13-26, 30, 49-50)

2.) blood sugar problems: glucose intolerance, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome (13-14,19,23-24,27-29)

3.) cancer prevention and improved cancer survival rates (7,8,11,14,15,24,31-37)

4.) upper respiratory tract infections, influenza and tuberculosis (24,30,38)

5.) cognitive impairment and low mood (38-40)

6.) autoimmune disease (multiple sclerosis, RA, systemic lupus erythromatosis (SLE) (15,24,26,29,30,32,41,42)

7.) misc. diseases: psoriasis, polycystic ovarian syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease

8.) urinary incontinence (54)

9.) and all-cause mortality! (5,6,7,24,30,51)

How “significant” are these associations? Here are some of the conclusions of various studies and meta-analyses (lots of studies looked at together) concerning Vit D. Italics are mine for emphasis.

“Research strongly supports the view … Vitamin D status would have significant protective effects against the development of cancer …. cancers of the breast, colon, prostate, ovary, lungs, and pancreas…” (8)

“High levels of Vitamin D among middle-age and elderly populations are associated with a substantial decrease in cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome.” (9)

“Low levels of [Vitamin D] are independently predictive for fatal strokes” (10)

“It is estimated that there is a 30 to 50% reduction in risk for developing colorectal, breast, and prostate cancer by either increasing Vitamin D intake or increasing sun exposure…” (11)

“Oral Vitamin D supplementation between 700 to 800 IU/d appears to reduce the risk of hip and any nonvertebral fractures in ambulatory or institutionalized elderly persons” (12)

” 28 studies including 99,745 participants … highest levels of serum [Vit D] were associated with a 43% reduction in cardiometabolic disorders (cardiovascular disease, diabetes and metabolic syndrome) …” (9)

Are Your Vitamin D Levels Optimal? (Vitamin D Deficiency is Widespread)

One billion people worldwide are estimated to be Vit D deficient, and the problem affects us here in the United States as well. (2) One study found that more than half of North American women receiving drugs for prevention or treatment of osteoporosis were Vitamin D deficient. (1) Another study found 48% of pre-adolescent girls to be Vit D deficient (3). Other studies have found that 40% to 100% of older men and women in both the United States and Europe are Vitamin D deficient.[2] Because of the importance of Vit D and how widespread Vit D deficiency is, an estimated $100 to $200 billion is spent (wasted) each year on diseases which may really just be Vitamin D deficiencies. [4]

Age, overweight, dark skin color, use of sunscreen, and overprotection from the sun’s rays are causes of decreased production of Vit D in response to sunlight. (52,52)

How Much Vitamin D Should You Take?

Ideally, you should take whatever amount of Vitamin D puts you in the “optimal” range. Since the amount will be highly variable depending on age, sex, race, weight, daily sun exposure and diet, there is no “one size fits all” answer. Instead, blood testing of Vitamin D levels and increasing intake until optimal levels are reached is the surest way to obtain optimal concentrations of Vitamin D in the body.

Deficiency Insufficiency Sufficiency * Optimal Excess (Toxicity) <20ng/ml 20-32ng/ml 32-100ng/ml 40-80ng/ml > 150ng/ml

* – conventional medicine says that 30 ng/ml is “sufficient.” Chart references (59-62)

At the wellness Club we believe the most accurate and effective way to embark on a program of Vit D supplementation is to perform a Vit D test, supplement Vit D in accordance with the results, and then re-test in 3 months at which time your daily doses of Vit D can be fine-tuned for maintenance. March (right now!) is the best time to test initially because Vit. D stores tend to be lowest in this month.

The Vitamin D Council, a non-profit group dedicated to Vitamin D research and education recommends people take 5,000 IU per day for 2-3 months, then perform a Vitamin D test. They then suggest adjusting the dosage so that blood levels are between 50-80 ng/mL (or 125-200 nM/L) year-round. (55)

Alternately, some people opt to supplement without knowing their initial Vit D levels. A dose of 2000IU is quite conservative but certainly safe for almost anyone. In cases of significant Vit D deficiency conservative dosing such as this may take considerable time to rebuild healthy stores of this important Vitamin.

For those who wish to calculate their own Vit D requirements, 100 IU of Vitamin D could be expected to raise blood level of 25(OH)D by 1 ng/ml. (11)

Can too much Vitamin D can be toxic? Research shows that massive doses may eventually cause toxicity. One source found that in adults a sustained intake of 50,000 IU daily could produce toxicity within a few months (58) and 40,000 IU per day in infants has been shown to produce toxicity within 1 to 4 months. (56) That is ten times the recommended dose for each of those age groups! Vitamin D testing is good insurance that will allow you to safely fine-tune your dosage to your actual needs. Be careful though, since not all testing is the same and lab references and standards vary – be sure that you are comparing “apples to apples” and obtaining useable results when you are tested.

The 25-hydroxyVitamin D blood test (25(OH)D blood test) is a test that measures the amount of calcidiol circulating in the blood. This is the most accurate measure of the amount of Vitamin D in the body. The Wellness Club offers Vitamin D testing – performed by a lab that adheres to standardized references and values so that you know what you are getting when you receive your results. This can is performed at home with a “spot” (finger stick) blood test. Other tests that require a blood draw are also available.

How to Get to Your Optimal Vitamin D Levels

Start Vitamin D supplementation eight to twelve weeks before testing. Dr. John Cannell of the Vitamin D Council suggests a starting dose of 1,000 IU per 25 pounds of body weight. For example, a 150 pound person would take 6,000 IU Vitamin D per day. (150 divided by 25 = 6; 1,000IU x 6 = 6,000). Maintain this dose for 8-12 weeks, then test.

This dose may or may not put you in the optimal target range, but it certainly won’t put you in any “toxic” range. Remember, most adults can safely take up to 10,000IU per day and still be far away from Vitamin D toxicity which typically appears at 40,000-50,000IU taken for several months.

Although this dose should theoretically put you in an optimal range, numerous personal variations alter Vitamin D requirements. Some people will need a higher dose than this calculation affords. However, taking the calculated dose should at least put you “in the ballpark” for optimal dosing.

When you test results come back, you can use the number to help you know whether or not you need to increase your Vit D dose and by how much. It is estimated that each 1,000 IU increase in supplemental Vitamin D will generally produce a 10 ng/ml increase in the Vitamin D blood level (8). If your test result shows that you are 10ng/ml below your target, increase daily Vit D intake by 1,000IU per day for a total of 7,000IU per day from the above example. Continue this dose and re-test in another 3 months to verify that you are now in your optimal range.

Congratulations! You have found your optimal daily Vitamin D intake needed to maintain optimal Vitamin D blood levels.

How to Obtain Vitamin D Naturally

Exposure to sun is the most natural way to boost Vit D levels. Medical scientists have found that the skin produces approximately 10,000 IU of Vitamin D in response to as little as 30 minutes of unprotected summer sun exposure. (57)

Vitamin D can be obtained from food too. Since rickets in children is such a crippling but preventable condition, governments have long encouraged the “fortification” of dairy products and breads and cereals with token amounts of Vitamin D. In the United States and Canada, for example, fortified milk typically provides 100 IU per glass.

It is difficult to obtain optimal levels of Vitamin D from food alone.

Food IUs per serving* Percent DV** Cod liver oil, 1 tablespoon 1,360 340 Salmon (sockeye), cooked, 3 ounces 794 199 Mushrooms that have been exposed to ultraviolet light to increase vitamin D, 3 ounces (not yet commonly available) 400 100 Mackerel, cooked, 3 ounces 388 97 Tuna fish, canned in water, drained, 3 ounces 154 39 Milk, nonfat, reduced fat, and whole, vitamin D-fortified, 1 cup 115-124 29-31 Orange juice fortified with vitamin D, 1 cup (check product labels, as amount of added vitamin D varies) 100 25 Yogurt, fortified with 20% of the DV for vitamin D, 6 ounces (more heavily fortified yogurts provide more of the DV) 80 20 Margarine, fortified, 1 tablespoon 60 15 Sardines, canned in oil, drained, 2 sardines 46 12 Liver, beef, cooked, 3.5 ounces 46 12 Ready-to-eat cereal, fortified with 10% of the DV for vitamin D, 0.75-1 cup (more heavily fortified cereals might provide more of the DV) 40 10 Egg, 1 whole (vitamin D is found in yolk) 25 6 Cheese, Swiss, 1 ounce 6 2 *IUs = International Units.

**DV = Daily Value. DVs were developed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to help consumers compare the nutrient contents of products within the context of a total diet. The DV for vitamin D is 400 IU for adults and children age 4 and older. Food labels, however, are not required to list vitamin D content unless a food has been fortified with this nutrient.

Table courtesy of the U.S. Government National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements

Although cod liver oil is high in Vitamin D, it is also high in Vitamin A which interferes with Vit D uptake, so cod liver oil is not the best supplemental form of Vit D. Keep daily intake of pre-formed Vitamin A to a maximum of 5,000IU per day so as not to interfere with Vitamin D absorption. Beta carotene does not appear to interfere with Vit. D uptake.

Vegetarians need to be sure they are getting plenty of sunshine, because other than tiny amounts that may be found in UV-irradiated mushrooms, there are no vegetable sources of Vitamin D.

The Bottom Line on Vitamin D

Achieving Optimal Vitamin D  levels appears to be one of the most important things we can do for our overall health and life expectancy.

Please click on the image below enjoy an interesting and instructive video which discusses the relationship between Vitamin D and Cancer.

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References

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2.) Holick MF. Vitamin D deficiency. N Engl J Med. 2007;357:266-281.
3.) Sullivan SS, Rosen CJ, Halteman WA, Chen TC, Holick MF. Adolescent girls in Maine at risk for Vitamin D insufficiency. J Am Diet Assoc. 2005;105:971-974.
4.) GrassrootsHealth. The Vitamin D deficiency epidemic. A call to D*action. http://www.grassrootshealth.org/daction/epidemic.php. Accessed May 8, 2009.
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7.) Thomas L. Lenz. Vitamin D Supplementation and Cancer Prevention. Am J Lifestyle Med. 2009;3(5):365-368.
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36.) Pilz S, Tomaschitz A, Obermayer-Pietsch B, Dobnig H, Pieber TR. Epidemiology of Vitamin D insufficiency and cancer mortality. Anticancer Res. 2009 Sep;29(9):3699-704.
37.) Ginde AA, Mansbach JM, Camargo CA Jr. Association between serum 25-hydroxyVitamin D level and upper respiratory tract infection in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Arch Intern Med. 2009 Feb 23;169(4):384-90.
38.) Annweiler C, Schott AM, Allali G, Bridenbaugh SA, Kressig RW, Allain P, Herrmann FR, Beauchet O. Association of Vitamin D deficiency with cognitive impairment in older women: cross-sectional study. Neurology. 2010 Jan 5;74(1):27-32. Epub 2009 Sep 30.
39.) Cherniack EP, Troen BR, Florez HJ, Roos BA, Levis S. Some new food for thought: the role of Vitamin D in the mental health of older adults. Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2009 Feb;11(1):12-9.
40.) Wilkins CH, Sheline YI, Roe CM, Birge SJ, Morris JC. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with low mood and worse cognitive performance in older adults. Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2006 Dec;14(12):1032-40.
41.) Cutolo M, Otsa K. Review: Vitamin D, immunity and lupus. Lupus. 2008;17(1):6-10.
42.) Kamen DL, Cooper GS, Bouali H, Shaftman SR, Hollis BW, Gilkeson GS. Vitamin D deficiency in systemic lupus erythematosus. Autoimmun Rev. 2006 Feb;5(2):114-7. Epub 2005 Jun 21.
43.) Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Willett WC, Wong JB, Giovannucci E, Dietrich T, Dawson-Hughes B. Fracture prevention with Vitamin D supplementation: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. JAMA. 2005 May 11;293(18):2257-64.
44.) Bischoff HA, Stähelin HB, Tyndall A, Theiler R. Relationship between muscle strength and Vitamin D metabolites: are there therapeutic possibilities in the elderly? Z Rheumatol. 2000;59 Suppl 1:39-41.
45.) DIPART (Vitamin D Individual Patient Analysis of Randomized Trials) Group. Patient level pooled analysis of 68 500 patients from seven major Vitamin D fracture trials in US and Europe. BMJ. 2010 Jan 12;340:b5463. doi: 10.1136/bmj.b5463.
46.) Houston DK, Cesari M, Ferrucci L, Cherubini A, Maggio D, Bartali B, Johnson MA, Schwartz GG, Kritchevsky SB. Association between Vitamin D status and physical performance: the InCHIANTI study. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2007 Apr;62(4):440-6.
47.) Kwon J, Suzuki T, Yoshida H, Kim H, Yoshida Y, Iwasa H. Concomitant lower serum albumin and Vitamin D levels are associated with decreased objective physical performance among Japanese community-dwelling elderly. Gerontology. 2007;53(5):322-8. Epub 2007 May 29.
48.) Pfeifer M, Begerow B, Minne HW. Vitamin D and muscle function. Osteoporos Int. 2002 Mar;13(3):187-94.
49.) Judd SE, Nanes MS, Ziegler TR, Wilson PW, Tangpricha V. Optimal Vitamin D status attenuates the age-associated increase in systolic blood pressure in white Americans: results from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jan;87(1):136-41.
50.) Pilz S, Dobnig H, Fischer JE, Wellnitz B, Seelhorst U, Boehm BO, März W. Low Vitamin d levels predict stroke in patients referred to coronary angiography. Stroke. 2008 Sep;39(9):2611-3. Epub 2008 Jul 17.
51.) Melamed ML, Michos ED, Post W, Astor B.25-hydroxyVitamin D levels and the risk of mortality in the general population. Arch Intern Med. 2008 Aug 11;168(15):1629-37.
52.) Jacobs ET, Alberts DS, Foote JA, Green SB, Hollis BW, Yu Z, Martínez ME. Vitamin D insufficiency in southern Arizona. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Mar;87(3):608-13.
53.) Park S, Johnson MA. Living in low-latitude regions in the United States does not prevent poor Vitamin D status. Nutr Rev. 2005 Jun;63(6 Pt 1):203-9.
54.) Low Vitamin D Levels Tied to Incontinence. WebMD March 22, 2010 http://www.webmd.com/urinary-incontinence-oab/news/20100322/low-Vitamin-d-linked-incontinence.
55.) The Vitamin D Council. Vitamin D Council
56.) Wikipedia: Vitamin D. Wikipedia Vitamine D
57.) Holick MF. Environmental factors thatinfluence the cutaneous production of Vitamin D. Am J Clin Nutr. 1995 Mar;61(3 Suppl):638S-645S.
58.) Vieth R. Vitamin D supplementation, 25-hydroxyVitamin D concentrations, and safety. Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 May;69(5):842-56.
59.) Holick MF. Vitamin D deficiency. N Engl J Med. 2007;357:266-281.
60.) GrassrootsHealth. Disease incidence prevention by serum 25(OH)D level.Grassroots Heaalth. Accessed May 8, 2009.
61.) Dall T, Anderson J. Vitamin D: merging research into clinical lipid practice. Lipid Spin. 2008;6(3):4-8.
62.) Heaney RP. What is a Vitamin D deficiency?Grassroots Health Vitamin D deficiency. Accessed May 8, 2009.

 

 

Potassium Citrate Powder


Potassium Citrate100% Pure Food Grade Tri-Potassium Citrate Powder (Anhydrous Tripotassium Citrate)

Potassium is an alkalinizing mineral that is typically deficient in the American diet.
The primary source of dietary potassium is from fruits and vegetables.

Mild metabolic acidosis (MMA) results from low intakes of alkaline fruits and vegetables and
high intakes of grain and protein foods. This MMA can cause the gradual leaching of minerals from bone,leading to osteoporosis. MMA and/or lack of urinary citrate is also a metabolic factor in the formationof kidney stones.

Potassium citrate serves as a source of both potassium and citrate and has been found useful for:

  • increasing bone mineral density and improving bone architecture (1-4)
  • decreasing the formation of kidney stones by up to 93% (3-11)
  • alkalinizing the body and reversing mild metabolic acidosis (7)

Potassium Citrate Powder is used to treat kidney damage and specifically, metabolic acidosis which is where the blood is more acidic than normal. Potassium Citrate Powder may be used to help pass kidney and bladder stones through the body easily and less painfully, as it causes the stones to break down while passing through the body.

Some people take Potassium Citrate Powder just to reduce the amount of acid in the urine or increase the pH levels- that is, to “alkalinize.”

Suggested Use: Take as directed by your health care professional. DO NOT take more than recommended.

Doses in the studies range from 1 mEq/kg daily in children (10) up to 80 mEq (3120milligrams) daily total for adults. (7-8)
Eight grams (8g) of potassium citrate contains approximately 3,000mg potassium. This amount can be found in 1 and 1/4 tsp.

It is best taken in divided doses; that is, divided into two or three doses daily.

To use: Carefully measure and mix the desired amount of potassium citrate in a glass of warm water, mix well, and drink. Can be mixed with sugar-free flavored beverages – we recommend ZipFizz for a healthy “sports drink.”

References:

1.)  Jehle S, Hulter HN, Krapf R. Effect of Potassium Citrate on Bone Density,
Microarchitecture, and Fracture Risk in Healthy Older Adults without Osteoporosis:
A Randomized Controlled Trial. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Nov 15. [Epub ahead
of print]
2.) Harrington M, Cashman KD. High salt intake appears to increase bone resorption
in postmenopausal women but high potassium intake ameliorates this adverse effect.
Nutr Rev. 2003 May;61(5 Pt 1):179-83.
3.) Jehle S, Zanetti A, Muser J, Hulter HN, Krapf R. Partial neutralization of the
acidogenic Western diet with potassium citrate increases bone mass in
postmenopausal women with osteopenia. J Am Soc Nephrol. 2006
Nov;17(11):3213-22. Epub 2006 Oct 11.
4.) Vescini F, Buffa A, La Manna G, Ciavatti A, Rizzoli E, Bottura A, Stefoni S,
Caudarella R. Long-term potassium citrate therapy and bone mineral density in
idiopathic calcium stone formers. J Endocrinol Invest. 2005 Mar;28(3):218-22.
5.) Lojanapiwat B, Tanthanuch M, Pripathanont C, Ratchanon S, Srinualnad S,
Taweemonkongsap T, Kanyok S, Lammongkolkul S. Alkaline citrate reduces stone
recurrence and regrowth after shockwave lithotripsy and percutaneous
nephrolithotomy. Int Braz J Urol. 2011 Sep-Oct;37(5):611-6.
6.) Pak CY, Peterson RD, Poindexter J. Prevention of spinal bone loss by potassium
citrate in cases of calcium urolithiasis. J Urol. 2002 Jul;168(1):31-4.
7.) Pak CY, Fuller C. Idiopathic hypocitraturic calcium-oxalate nephrolithiasis
successfully treated with potassium citrate. Ann Intern Med. 1986 Jan;104(1):33-7.
8.) Preminger GM, Sakhaee K, Skurla C, Pak CY. Prevention of recurrent calcium
stone formation with potassium citrate therapy in patients with distal renal tubular
acidosis. J Urol. 1985 Jul;134(1):20-3.
9.) Robinson MR, Leitao VA, Haleblian GE, Scales CD Jr, Chandrashekar A, Pierre
SA, Preminger GM. Impact of long-term potassium citrate therapy on urinary profiles
and recurrent stone formation. J Urol. 2009 Mar;181(3):1145-50. Epub 2009 Jan 18.
10.) Sarica K, Erturhan S, Yurtseven C, Yagci F. Effect of potassium citrate therapy
on stone recurrence and regrowth after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy in
children. J Endourol. 2006 Nov;20(11):875-9.
11.) Soygür T, Akbay A, Küpeli S. Effect of potassium citrate therapy on stone
recurrence and residual fragments after shockwave lithotripsy in lower caliceal
calcium oxalate urolithiasis: a randomized controlled trial. J Endourol. 2002
Apr;16(3):149-52.

 

Hyaluronan / Hyaluronic Acid


“Joint Juice”

Hyaluronic Acid, or Hyaluronan, is a major component of the lubricating fluid in our joints.

It has long been known that deterioration of hyaluronic acid in the fluid in joints can begin in people as young as 28 years old. As we age it is common for joints to become deficient in the hyaluronon molecule, causing a loss of “lubricity” of the fluid and resulting in the aches and pains in the joints that many of us just write off as “just getting older.”

So, what is hyaluronic acid (HA) anyway?

HA is the molecule that holds all the moisture in your body in place. HA is present in the fluid that coats your muscle sheaths, in your connective tissues, in your eyes, your skin and hair and in the fluid that keeps your joints, tendons and ligaments elastic. It provides the “slipperiness.”

Supplementing with HA has been shown to dramatically improve aches, pains, and ability to perform athletic exercise.

PlayAgain HyaluronanThere is only one HA supplement available that meets Dr. Myatt’s standards – it is a high molecular weight liquid form of HA that is easily and quickly absorbed through the tissues of the mouth and esophogus (throat).

Why is this important? It is important because low molecular weight HA does not tend to find it’s way to the areas where it is needed – the joints and connective tissues. HA in tablet or capsule form must be absorbed from the gut – reducing availability even further.

That HA supplement is a product called PlayAgain.

Nurse Mark has been using PlayAgain and here is what he found:

“I am a 58 year old runner. My normal daily routine is to run several miles each morning. I do not run on pavement – I run along the cattle trails of the state lands (pastureland) behind our home. Over the past year or so I have noticed increasing discomfort in my hips following my runs. Like most people, I attributed it to “getting older” and controlled it with Bromelain, a natural antiinflammatory.

Recently while at a medical conference we met with the makers of PlayAgain Hyaluronic Acid. They asked me to trial their product and report my findings.

I used PlayAgain as directed – 3 tablespoons each morning for 10 days as a loading dose. I began to notice a reduction in hip discomfort on the 3rd to 4th day, and a significant increase in joint comfort and flexibility by the 10th day.

On the 10th day I ran out of PlayAgain, and was unable to replenish my supply for a week. By the end of that week without PlayAgain I was noticing a very definite return of my hip joint symptoms of discomfort and stiffness.

I have now resumed using PlayAgain (repeating the loading dose) and I am once again able to report decreased discomfort and stiffness and increased comfort on my daily runs.”

Because PlayAgain is temperature sensitive (The HA molecule can be damaged by excessively high temperatures and by freezing) we are not stocking this product at this time. We feel that it is better for our patients and customers to obtain PlayAgain directly from the manufacturer to ensure freshness and careful handling to preserve quality.

The manufacturer suggests an initial order of 2 bottles. One bottle will be for your loading dose, the other bottle will maintain you for the rest of the first month. We suggest a first order of 3 bottles so that you don’t risk running out as Nurse Mark did.

Can Wellness Club Members get their discount on PlayAgain?

No and there are no beter prices to be found anywhere than the prices on the manufacturers website – we have looked!

We have been able to negotiate with the PlayAgain people to obtain free shipping for our Wellness Club customers – simply click this link to go to the PlayAgain secure order page and at checkout use the code: ” FREESHIP ‘ (all caps, exactly as written, without the quotes) to save on shipping costs.